Antelope Horns in Bastrop

By the time the sun came up on Saturday, April 21, my wall hanging Antelope Horns was in the back seat of the car, and we were on the way to pick up my friend Peggy. Our destination was Bastrop, Texas, and our mission was to deliver Antelope Horns for the second round of judging for the Bastrop Art in Public Places 2D program.

Antelope Horns waiting for judges in Bastrop

Nearly three and a half hours later, we arrived at the Bastrop City Hall, where friendly folks greeted artists and showed us where to drop off our work. Antelope Horns is second from the right in this photo.

Anne Beck, who organized the competition, explained why artists were asked to bring their works to town for judging for the first time this year. Previously, judging was accomplished by looking at photos of artwork online and ranking them according to a list of criteria. Once the chosen art was installed in Bastrop’s public buildings, judges took a closer look at the artwork, this time choosing five pieces for cash prizes. Judges were amazed how different the art looked online versus in person.

Things changed slightly this year, with one group of judges viewing the original group of entries online, and choosing 30 pieces for the next round. Artists brought their work so the next judging panel could see them in real life, and choose the sixteen works to be displayed in Bastrop for one year.

Lost Pines Art Center, Bastrop, Texas

While the judges worked, artists and their guests took a tour of the Lost Pines Art Center, a community-centered gallery with classrooms and a gift shop. Even on that cloudy, drizzly day, lots of natural light streamed in, illuminating paintings, photos, and sculptures by area artists. I loved the butterfly mosaic by Jim and Marlene Outlaw, in the floor just inside one of the building’s entries.

Butterfly Mosaic by the Outlaws, Lost Pines Art Center, Bastrop, Texas

Antelope Horns in Bastrop Art in Public Places

BAiPP provided a nice lunch for us, and Peggy and I talked with our table-mates until Anne came in to tell us whose works would be staying in Bastrop.

I’m very glad to tell you that Antelope Horns is one of the sixteen! It is on display in the Bastrop Public Library until mid-April 2019.

Artists, if you’re within driving distance of Bastrop, I hope you’ll consider entering your work next year. To get their news, which will include notification of next year’s competition, sign up for the Bastrop Art in Public Places newsletter at their website. Good luck!

If you’re wondering “How did she do that?” you can read about the process of making Antelope Horns in the first three posts on the list, when you click this link: www.textilefusion.com/?s=Antelope+Horns. Here’s the short version: it is knitted, quilted, and embellished with crochet and embroidery.

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