Posts Tagged ‘art’

Arranging Flowers for Winterling

Monday, March 27th, 2017

I had to try many different flower arrangements before finding my favorite for Winterling. It was fun! Here are a few:

 TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson  TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson

Hmmm. Yeah, the white flowers seem too startlingly bright. So for the next try, I took the daisies off and also the big sunflower, because I thought it was too heavy and large for the composition.

 TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson

How about the one on the left?—it’s kind of minimal with a more controlled color selection. Given a choice, I usually go for fancy over minimal. The next one is alright.

 TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson

Thinking the sunflower might not be too heavy after all, I added it back in. Yep, I think this is the one.

 TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson

After pinning all the flowers and leaves in place, it was time to sit down and sew. And I mean sew for a long time.

Something kept bothering me about the Samarkand Sunflower which has a yellow center, then a white round and a band of periwinkle blue before the round of white petals. The blue band looked too plain and big. A few bright yellow seed beads took care of that problem.

 TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling, by Suzann Thompson

After sewing the flowers on, I appliqued a crocheted picot vine in the borders. Each picot has a seed bead on it, which is stitched in place to keep the picot from curling. Buttons berries grow from the vine.

That does it for Winterling! Want to know where the flower patterns are from? Visit this post at the Curious and Crafty readers blog to find out.

Winterling

Sunday, March 5th, 2017

step by step TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling

We don’t normally go around leaving coffeepots on the bed, but this is a special coffeepot. It’s from the now-closed Winterling chinaware factory in Schwarzenbach an der Saale in northern Bavaria. My great-grandmother, Lina Schoedel, worked there. One of Winterling’s patterns was the blue and white Zwiebelmuster or onion pattern.

This coffeepot became a vase in my TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling. But this isn’t the first time the Zwiebelmuster has inspired me: the Perspective Daisy and Curly Curlicues designs in Crochet Garden were inspired by the china, as well as the Leaves and Berries Spray (free pattern here).

step by step TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling

So back to the coffeepot on the bed. I photographed this scene to help me see how light and shadow would play in my wall hanging. Sometimes I use photos to create patterns for my wall hangings. After manipulating the photos in Adobe Photoshop Elements, I print a full-sized final draft.

Being a fan of color contrast, I chose orange for the background to the blue and white pattern of the coffeepot/vase. I sorted orange yarns into light, medium light, medium, medium dark, and dark qualities, and set to work knitting orange yardage on my Ultimate Sweater machine.

After blocking and stabilizing with fusible interfacing, the knitted yardage was smooth and even.

step by step TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling

It was time to cut up the knitting! For the curtains and vase, I used my paper pattern to cut pieces to the correct size and shape. For everything else, I cut patches of knitting freehand and fitted them together to form areas of light and shadow. I pinned the patches in place and sewed them to a foundation fabric which wouldn’t be visible in the finished piece.

step by step TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling

I couldn’t wait to try some flower arrangements. At the International Quilt Festival in Chicago, Spring 2016, participants in my Open Studios session arranged flowers. My first idea was to use blue, violet, and yellow flowers as a contrast to the orange. They soon convinced me that more colors were better.

step by step TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling step by step TextileFusion wall hanging, Winterling

If you’re thinking the vase in these pictures looks funny, you’re right. It’s because I was using my paper pattern as a place holder. But before finalizing the flower arrangement, I needed to create the vase with knitted fabric. That took a while.

Snowflake Wall Hanging

Friday, February 24th, 2017

step by step TextileFusion snowflake wall hanging

My sweet friend Hazel gave me a cardigan she bought years ago in Scotland. It was a pretty example of Fair Isle knitting, done with raglan sleeves. Thank you, Hazel!

The star pattern put me in a wintery, snowy frame of mind, and luckily there were just enough complete star motifs in the sweater for me to cut the long hexagons and form the points of the resulting snowflake.

Knitted scraps from previous wall hangings filled in the background. I sewed the patches together onto a foundation fabric, which won’t be visible in the finished piece.

step by step TextileFusion snowflake wall hanging

Next came quilting and binding, and I used fabrics from another generous person or people. The blue and white fabrics were in the estate of a lady from Germany. Her heirs wanted her fabrics to go to someone who would appreciate them.

I got to be that person! The link was the heirs’ former German teacher, who was also a friend of my mother’s. Thank you to those lovely people! I do appreciate their mother’s fabrics and laces and vintage handwork.

step by step TextileFusion snowflake wall hanging

As I’ve said many times, embellishment is my favorite part in the process of making wall hangings. There would be lots of button-sewing in my future.

step by step TextileFusion snowflake wall hanging

I was conflicted about which look to go for. I liked the subtle transparent and white buttons at the left of this photo and my daughter agreed. However, the bold blue buttons on the right seemed a better design choice.

Lately when in doubt, I go to Instagram. Many Instagram friends answered “Go for the bold!” Only one person agreed with Ella and me. I went with the majority.

Here are the blue buttons all sewn on.

step by step TextileFusion snowflake wall hanging

I’m still going to add transparent and white buttons around the flake. Looking forward to enjoying that zen zone of button sewing.

A Worthy Accomplishment

Sunday, January 8th, 2017

A Worthy Accomplishment, crochet and quilt art, by Suzann Thompson

“Art imitates life,” people say. Recently, I saw art holding up a mirror to life, and the mirror reflected much more than I can usually see with the unaided eye.

At the movies we saw a preview of a boy who draws a monster into life, who frightens the bullies in the boy’s life. In our main feature, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a sad, desperate, and powerless person inadvertently turned frustration into a powerful external force that destroyed buildings and killed people. This force manifested as a storm of destructive particles.

At home, we watched Star Trek Beyond, where the huge, fancy Starship Enterprise is taken down by a swarm of tiny spaceships, under the command of an unhappy former Starfleet officer.

Two takeaways for me: desperation can turn into a deadly force; lots of tiny things can take down a big thing. These two phenomena are happening in our world’s population right now.

Which brings me quite naturally, I think you will agree, to my latest wall hanging, A Worthy Accomplishment.

Our United States culture worships enormity. Large corporations, huge wealth and fame, amazing feats of technology are admired and given special treatment. In contrast, regular people who do regular thing, like raising children, cleaning, cooking, going to work every day and other essential but not very exciting or profitable things, are treated as insignificant.

I think we need a more balanced approach. It’s fine to admire amazing things, and we should also value and admire everyday work and achievement. We need to acknowledge the contribution of people who take care of all the everyday things in this country, because they are the foundation on which our society is built.

For my own part, I want to bring to your attention the contribution of many thousands of women (mostly) who took the time to crochet a doily to beautify their homes, or a pretty trim to make a pillowcase or coverlet more inviting.

I can guarantee you that many of these creators would say, “Oh that’s nothing, really. It’s just something I made.”

I say, “It is something, precisely because you made it.” It is something handmade, with love or curiosity and certainly with skill. It is something to be proud of, something beautiful, something worthy.

A Worthy Accomplishment, crochet and quilt art, by Suzann Thompson

Sweet Home

Saturday, November 19th, 2016

Sweet Home, crochet and quilt art, by Suzann Thompson

It’s nice to have a relatively quick project to do, after a very time-consuming one. So…Sweet Home.

Normally I would write about it here, but since it there are so many motifs on it from Cute Crochet World, its story is over at my book blog, Curious and Crafty Readers. See you there!

Evolution of Minimalism

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

In the late 1990s, minimalism in home décor was all the rage in England—at least that’s what we read in the newspapers at the time. Minimalist homes were clean, cleaner, cleanest! They were calm, uncluttered. Any decoration not strictly necessary for function was not allowed.

Minimalism is not my style, because I like decoration and stuff within easy reach. But I can see the attraction. It’s so full of potential—lots of surfaces to fill with books, paper, pens, vases, coffee cups.

For all the functional trendiness of minimalism, I feel that human eyes crave variation and decoration. So here’s a wall hanging all about how we may enjoy the starkness of minimalism for a while, and what happens next. Its title is Evolution of Minimalism.

In the beginning, we have the most minimal nine-patch ever. Sewn with patches of the exact same plain fabric, it is totally uncluttered. It’s so calming, so clean, so… Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

…so, well, boring. Hey, could we vary the color a little? Just to give it some interest?Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

That helped. A contrasting color would perk it up even more. But don’t worry, we can hold on to our minimalist roots by using the original colors.Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

Oooo! That squiggly pattern in the middle is kind of fun. It might be even more interesting to have some texture.Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

Love that single button in the middle, and the mother-of-pearl button fabric! Very subtle, how the pearl button fabric is next to the ocean wave patterned fabric. Clever. If one button is good, four buttons are better. Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

The nine-patch is getting kind of old. Whoa—this log cabin block is perfect. Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

Do you sense a tipping point? The log cabin is turning into a log pentagon. Do I see some red? Woo hoo!Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

Colors and buttons and flowers are busting out all over! Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

This is great! Lots of color! Lots of pattern! Lots of texture! It’s wonderful! Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson Wow. All this stuff is wearing me out, making me tired. Let’s clean up all this clutter and get back to basics. We’re going back to the beginning. Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

And so the natural evolution of minimalism goes.

It’s all coded in the DNA.

Evolution of Minimalism, by Suzann Thompson

TextileFusion in Portland, Oregon

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Finally, finally, finally the Quilt! Knit! Stitch! show, with its workshops and markets and exhibits came to Portland, Oregon, last week. The quilts and fiber arts were stunningly beautiful, as usual. And this time someone was exhibiting knitted, embellished quilts. Me!

TextileFusion art quilt exhibit at Quilt! Knit! Stitch! 2015

TextileFusion art quilt exhibit at Quilt! Knit! Stitch! 2015

TextileFusion art quilt exhibit at Quilt! Knit! Stitch! 2015

Next chance to see the TextileFusion exhibit is at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, Texas, October 29 through November 1, 2105. Come and talk to me there!

For more information, please visit www.quilts.com.

TextileFusion art quilt exhibit at Quilt! Knit! Stitch! 2015

Visions Art Museum Members’ Challenge, Met!

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

From the Visions Art Museum website:

The mission of Visions Art Museum is to create an international community of quilt and textile artists, collectors and the public through exhibitions, education, and engaging programs that increase the appreciation of quilts, textiles and fiber as fine art…

Visions Art Museum: Contemporary Quilts + Textiles is a program of Quilt San Diego, a non-profit arts organization founded in 1985 to promote contemporary quilt making as fine art.

Sunshine through Fog art quilt

It sounds pretty good, but what drew me in and caused me to part with hard-earned dollars for the membership fee was: Exhibition Opportunities!

Visions Museum offers frequent members’ challenges, themed online exhibits, and juried exhibitions—in other words, exactly what I spend a lot of time looking for.

The challenge pieces are small, giving quilters the chance to show their work without spending weeks on a project. The quilts are all for sale, with half of the sale price going to the museum, and half to the artist. Now that is a deal.

The current members’ challenge was to make a 10″ wide x 14″ tall quilt with the theme “Abstract.” Over 60 quilters answered the call, and our quilts are on display (and for sale) at the museum from April 18 – July 5, 2015.

Mine is called Sunshine through Fog, and see if you can find a teeny-tiny photo of it here.

Sunshine through Fog is pieced from fabric knitted on my Ultimate Sweater Machine. I like to shade colors when I knit, like the black-gray-white shading for this piece. This is what the fabric looked like after blocking. There’s a lot of yellow, because more small quilts with a similar look are on the drawing board.

This photo shows the quilt top pieced and pinned to batting and backing, ready to quilt. But wait…

Recently I discovered that a layer of tulle holds the unruly cut edges of the knitting in place very nicely. After consulting with a long-time associate (my teenage daughter), I added a layer of silvery-white tulle to the top, cutting out the spaces over the yellow areas.

And it came with a bonus! The tulle makes the piece look foggier.

Third Grade Art Days

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Third Grade Textile Art

I was the lucky one on October 23! My daughter Ella and I spent a busy morning with third graders at an Austin-area elementary school for Art Days. This is Ella at the beginning of the day.

Parents spent weeks organizing and preparing for Art Days, funded the purchase of most of the supplies, and organized visits by visual artists, musicians, actors, and authors. (Thank you, Carolyn, for inviting me!)

Our work room was all ready to go with a gallon of school glue and an 8 x 10″ canvas for each student. Ella and I brought buttons, beads, sequin trims, felt, and crocheted bits and pieces. After a while, the supplies got scattered around a little by those hard-working third graders.

Third Grade Textile Art

I had lots of…let’s call them crocheted beta-flowers–the prototypes for the flowers that became part of Crochet Bouquet and Crochet Garden.

They’ve been sitting on my storage shelves for years, because I couldn’t imagine throwing them away. The third graders made excellent use of them. Look!


Third Grade Textile Art

I am absolutely thrilled and amazed by every single one of these compositions. The colors, the enthusiasm, instinctive design sense–oh my.

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

This is “Superman with a Zipper.” See the green sequin “S” for Superman?

Third Grade Textile Art Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

The mother of the student who decorated the canvas at the bottom left, guessed correctly that it was his, without first seeing his name on the back. “Those are the colors in our playroom!” she said.

Third Grade Textile Art Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Third Grade Textile Art

Can you tell that two friends decorated these canvasses?

Third Grade Textile Art

Look, right in the middle is a “Mumsy”-prototype from Crochet Bouquet, and a “Baby Cornflower” from Crochet Garden in the top right corner.

Third Grade Textile Art

This is a “Byzantine Beauty” from Crochet Garden. I crocheted several different versions of that flower before finally getting it right.

The young lady that created this design was quietly confident. She studied the canvas, rummaged around in the piles of supplies, and came back with exactly the right piece to accent the Byzantine Beauty. She repeated the process until she was satisfied.

Sixth Grade Textile Art

Ella finally got to decorate her own canvas, after helping third-graders all morning.

Gail Hughes Art Buttons at the Quilt Festival!

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Gail Hughes Art Button selection

Gail Hughes will be selling her gorgeous buttons at the Quilt Festival, November 2 (preview night) through November 6, in Houston, Texas. She designs and manufactures them herself in the United States. Hurray!

In case you’ve missed my previous posts about Gail’s buttons, let me gush about them some more. They’re colorful. They’re all shapes and sizes. Whether you love texture, multi-colors, or sparkles, you’ll find something to please you in Gail’s booth. I love the shiny buttons, and the ones that glow from within a matte finish and look like delicious candy.

Gail Hughes button with copper inclusion

My pink with green polka dotted flower buttons by Gail would be right at home in a Dr. Seuss book. Her crisply sculptural buttons will send your mind back to the Art Deco era and Bakelite.

A primitive human need to own beautiful objects drives me to buy Gail’s buttons. I’ve bought for a cardigan awaiting closure. Other times I design a project around the buttons.

Experience the thrill of Gail Hughes Art Buttons at Quilt Festival next month!