Archive for the ‘Reader Query’ Category

Crochet Kaiser Roll Hints

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Thanks to Lindsay for asking about the Kaiser roll in Cute Crochet World. It’s part of the “Cheese Sandwich on a Kaiser Roll” pattern on pages 56-58.

Crocheting the Kaiser roll, I ran across two places in the instructions that need correcting:

  • Page 57, third column, second paragraph, 4th and 5th lines down should read “transfer ch-2 lp of Rnd 2” not Rnd 1.
  • Same page and column, end of Rnd 6 should read “join with a sl st to ch2 at beg of rnd and end off OR cut yarn and needle join.” The words “and end off, or” are missing in the printed instructions.

You can find corrections for all of my books by following the links in the sidebar of this blog. If you find a mistake in one of my patterns, please let me know and I’ll list it in the corrections pages.

Alright, back to crocheting a bread roll. The top of the roll has the subtly swirled, puffed look of a real, yeast bread bun. Here’s how to get that texture.

In the “Read Me First” section of Cute Crochet World, page 8, I wrote about the “first stitch” and the “next stitch.” It’s so important in crochet to pay attention to details like this in the instructions, and be able to recognize them in your work.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

In this photo, Rnd 1 is joined with a sl st in the first sc of the round. To begin Rnd 2, ch 2 (which counts as the first hdc), and hdc in the first stitch, which is the same stitch you sl stitched into to join Rnd 1.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

To join Rnd 2, sl st in the top of the ch-2 at the beginning of the round. Can you see the sets of 4 hdc sts separated by ch-3 spaces?

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

To make it easier to find them later, place a marker around each of the five ch-2 in Rnd 2. I used safety pins here.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

With Rnd 5 finished, you can see how the hdcs are moving in a little swirl pattern. The ch-spaces move a couple or three stitches counterclockwise with each round.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

After Rnd 5, enlarge the live loop far enough that it won’t start unraveling as you work on the next step.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Turn to the wrong side of your work. Look at the ladders formed by the ch-sts. Rnd 2, where you have markers, is the first rung of the ladder. Three more rungs follow (Rnds 3, 4, and 5).

Insert a larger hook under the first rung, where the marker is. Remove the marker. Insert the hook under the second rung and pull the second rung through the first.

This will feel pretty tight, but that’s how it is supposed to feel. You can use your fingers to lift the loops. It’s a lot easier that way.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

*Insert your hook under the next chain and pull it through the chain on your hook. Rep from * once. The yellow bracket shows the ladder of chain spaces, all chained up.

Now put the marker or safety pin into that last loop to hold it in place. Do the same with the other four chain ladders.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

When you are finished chaining up all the ladders, turn back to the right side. See the fluffy Kaiser roll top?

Insert your smaller hook back into the enlarged loop and tighten the loop around the hook.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

In Rnd 6, when you get to a loop with a marker in it, work a hdc into the loop and remove the marker.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

After crocheting into the loop, the instructions tell you to skip the next hdc, and hdc into the next 5 hdc. You may not be able to see the skipped hdc very well, since it may be covered or squished by the stitch you just completed. However you should be able to see five hdc before the next marker. In the photo above, they are marked with yellow dots. Hdc into each of those.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

A needle-join is by far the best way to finish off this cute Kaiser roll top. After the last hdc, cut the yarn and pull the final loop right out of the top of the last stitch.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Thread the yarn end into a tapestry needle. Skip the ch-2 and take the needle under the top of the first full hdc of the round. Pull it through.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Insert the needle into the top of the last st of Rnd 6…

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

…and on the wrong side catch the vertical loops of the hdc. Pull the needle through. Adjust the loop to match the tension of the other loops around the edge of the roll.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Here’s the finished top. Now is the time to sew on beads to resemble seeds, if you want.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Crochet an inside bun. Sew the bun pieces together around the edges, stuffing lightly before you close the seam completely.

Crocheted Cheese Sandwich on Kaiser Roll

Hints for Making “Mamas and Papas,” Part 3 of 3–Arms and Hands

Friday, February 19th, 2016

The Mamas and Papas’ arms and hands are pretty simple to crochet, once you decide exactly what you want. The sidebar “Arms” on page 141 of Cute Crochet World gives some general hints. Specific instructions for Mama’s arms begin on page 139, and Papa’s arms are on page 141.

Where you place the arm on each sleeve changes the gesture of the person. An arm high on the sleeve is waving, while an arm low on the sleeve is at rest at the person’s side.

The other decision to make is whether the arm is “hand first” or “thumb first.” When you make any arm, you make a chain. As you work back along the chain to finish the arm, “hand first” means you will crochet the hand first; and “thumb first” means the thumb will be completed first. Let’s look at a few examples.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

I crocheted Lio’s left arm at the side of the sleeve, so he looks like he’s welcoming someone or about to pat someone on the back. This arm is “hand first,” because after making the initial chain, the hand is the first thing you make, and then the thumb. This arm is slightly bent, because of one decrease at the elbow—this option is given in the instructions.

Lio’s right arm hangs straight and relaxed at his side, crocheted onto the bottom of the sleeve. This arm is also “hand first.”

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Irene’s left arm, crocheted into the side of her sleeve, is waving and “hand first.” Her right arm is by her side, “thumb first,” and bent.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Nils’s left arm hangs straight by his side, “hand first.” His right arm is waving, attached to the top of his sleeve, “thumb first.”

Can you figure out which comes first–the hand or the thumb—for Rog and Pam? (Answer below the photos.)

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

ANSWER: Rog and Pam’s left arms: “hand first;” and their right arms: “thumb first.”

You can plan this all before you start, or you can test different arms to get a better idea of how they will look. Just crochet a couple of thumb-first and hand-first arms, bent and straight. Instead of drawing up a loop in the sleeve, just begin with a slip knot on your hook.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Now you can test different arm positions before you commit. The arms are made with so few stitches, it won’t take long to take this option.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

For the new Mama and Papa, I wanted to arrange their arms so her right hand could hold his left hand. She would wave with her left arm, and his right arm would be relaxed at his side.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s left arm is bent with “hand first” and her right arm is “thumb first.” Papa’s left arm is “thumb first” and his right is “hand first.” And here they are!

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

* * * * * *

One more thing. Rog and Pam have travelled with me several places for photography. They weren’t strong enough to stand on important tourist landmarks, so I stabilized them with felt. You may consider doing this, if you’re thinking of making Mamas and Papas for toys.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Hints for Making the Mamas and Papas of Cute Crochet World, Part 2 of 3

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Start Mama’s legs and Papa’s trousers by drawing up a loop in the lower edge of the dress or shirt. The instructions say “join with a sl st,” which to my mind (at the time I wrote the instructions) meant the same thing. “Draw up a loop” is a better way to say what I meant.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Chain as instructed, and then work back along the chain to create the leg.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s feet are shaped by increasing or decreasing at the heel, and her slender ankles are sc, while her shapely calves are hdc.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

The shoe on this foot begins at the toe. The shoe on the other foot begins at the heel. You’ll see as you follow the directions, why this is.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s legs are worked separately.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

To start Papa’s trousers, draw up a loop in the appropriate stitch at the lower edge of Papa’s shirt. Chain and then work back along the chain to make the first trouser leg. Row 2 is only two sc, which serve to join the trouser legs. From the last sc, chain out again (photo shows how he looks at this point), work back along the chain to create the second trouser leg, and join to the shirt.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Use one of the yarn ends to sew the last dc of the legs to the edge of the shirt. I wove my needle back and forth to catch loops from the legs and the shirt, as in the photo above. I pulled the yarn end through and wove it in a different direction to make sure it wouldn’t come loose.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Papa’s shoes are worked into the turning ch at the end of the trouser legs. Take a moment to find the four ch-sts of each turning ch before you start. The photo shows how first shoe begins with drawing up a loop in the first ch of the ch4-loop. The blue dots indicate the second, third, and fourth ch-sts.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

The second shoe begins with hdc in the second ch of the ch4-loop. To begin with hdc, place a slip knot on your hook, yo, hold these loops in place with your fingers, draw up a loop in the second ch, yo, and complete the st as you would any hdc.

The blue dots show each of the four ch-sts. The black stitch is in the second ch.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama and Papa are ready for arms. There’s lots of choice with arms—waving, expansive, relaxed. What will I choose? Maybe a little of each, so you can see how to make them in the next post.

Hints for Making the Mamas and Papas of Cute Crochet World, Part 1 of 3

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Crocheted Mamas and Papas

I’m so glad reader and crocheter Janet S. asked for a little help with the Mamas and Papas of Cute Crochet World. She is using them to decorate crocheted bags.

Complete written instructions for the Mamas and Papas are on pages 137-141. The hair, clothing, arms, and legs are joined as you work. I like to weave in ends as I go.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Begin with the head. It is worked in the round, but it is oval because the stitches on the sides are shorter than the stitches at the top of the head and the chin. The tallest stitch is htr; find directions for htr here.

After you join the first round for the head, the neck is simply the first few stitches of a second round.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mamas and Papas have lots of hairstyles to choose from, with instructions for each on page 140. I’m giving this Mama a Cleopatra hairdo, which starts in the second stitch from the neck. You can see how I skipped the first stitch, and I’ve joined the hair color with a tr.

To join with a tr (instead of a sl st and ch 4), place a slip knot on the hook. Holding the knot in place with the fingers on your hook-holding hand, yo twice, insert the hook, and pull up a loop. Now you have 4 loops on the hook, so finish the stitch just like any tr.

Once you get the hang of beginning a row or round with a stitch (instead of sl st and chain), I think you’ll like it a lot. It looks neater than the sl st and chain at the beginning.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama has the Cleopatra hair and Papa has a crew cut.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Turn Mama to the wrong side to start the dress. Work the first row into the three stitches of the neck. In the photo above, I have joined the dress color with 4 dc in the first stitch. The next two stitches are marked with arrows.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s rounded sleeves are made with two clusters of 4 tr. The instructions tell you exactly how to do this. In this photo, I am at the top of page 139. I have 5 loops on the hook and I’m ready to yo and pull through all loops to complete the first 4tr-cluster.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

The first row of Papa’s shirt is similar to the first row of Mama’s dress—begin on the wrong side. The green arrow in this photo shows the beginning of the second row, where we make the sleeves. Ch 4 at the beginning of the row, then make a joined-tr. A joined-tr is attached to the chain, and keeps it from gapping.

To make the joined-tr for Papa’s shirt, Yo, draw up a loop in the 3rd ch from hook, draw up a loop in the first st. Now you have 4 loops on the hook, and you can finish this tr just like any other tr.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

End off after the first two rows of the dress or shirt. Weave in ends to get them out of the way. To finish the garments, turn to the wrong side and place the first sts into the sts shown by the green arrows.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

To keep the turning chains in Mama’s dress and Papa’s shirt from creating gaps, use a joined-dc. Instructions for that are on page 17.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

When the dress and shirt are finished, they’ll look like this. We’ll crochet legs and shoes in the next post.

Step-by-Step Rafflesita–A Pattern Supplement

Friday, May 15th, 2015

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

The Rafflesia is a great, big flower—about 3 feet across. It’s the inspiration for this tiny version, called “Rafflesita.” Because –ita means little. The pattern for “Rafflesita” is on pages 122-123 of Crochet Garden: Bunches of Flowers, Leaves, and Other Delights. These photos and notes are meant to supplement the instructions in the book. Thank you Kathleen, for asking about the instructions.

The samples in Crochet Garden are each crocheted from a single variegated yarn. These photos show a flower made with several colors, so you can see the different parts of the flower better. And besides, it looks pretty good.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Rnds 1 and 2 are straightforward rounds of double crochet. Rnd 3 is worked into the Front Loop (FL) Only of Rnd 2. It forms a support for the final round of the flower. Rnd 4 is worked into the Back Loop (BL) Only of Rnd 2. You will work the petals and the final round of the flower into Rnd 4.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Here’s the first petal done, and the second petal begun. This is the “ch 6” of 5A in the pattern. The chain takes you away from the flower center.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Continuing 5A, you work back toward the flower center, along the ch, and join to the BL of the next st of Rnd 4.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Instruction 5B has you stitching away from the flower again.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

And 5C has you coming back toward the center, and joining with a sl st in the BL of the next st of Rnd 4.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Crochet away from the flower in 5D.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Crochet back toward the center for 5E, but pay attention here, because you’re going to skip one st of Rnd 4, before joining with a sl st in the BL of the next st.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Back out one more time with 5F.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Toward the flower center one last time for 5G, and you’re done with the next petal.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

When the petals are complete, slip stitch around each petal as described in Rnd 6. If you find that 16 sl sts across the top are too many or too few, please alter the pattern to suit you.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

To begin Rnd 7 with a dc, place a slip knot on your hook (as if you were starting a new project), yo hook, and draw up a loop in any FL of Rnd 4. Now you have 3 loops on the hook. Finish the dc as usual.

The FLs of Rnd 4 are pretty easy to see in this photo. They are the line of loops just inside the petal row.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Rnd 7 is worked from the top of the flower. If you’re a right-handed crocheter (meaning you hold the hook in your right hand—doesn’t matter which hand you write with), proceed in the direction of the arrow in this picture.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

For me, it was easiest to fold the petals back and hold them with my thumb.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

When you’re finished with Rnd 7, cut the yarn and pull the final loop out of the top of the last st (A in photo). Thread the yarn into a needle, and take the needle under the top lps of the 2nd st of the rnd (B in photo).

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Take the needle down into the top of the final stitch, where the arrow is pointing in the photo. Tighten the loop to make it the same tension as the other stitches. Weave in the ends.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Rafflesita’s center is like a little bowl, where you can store small things, like these fossils.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Step-by-Step Baby Carriage

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Crocheted Baby Carriage from Cute Crochet World

Louanne is going to crochet a Baby Carriage for a baby shower gift. Great idea! She needed help visualizing how the pattern worked, so here are some photos. Find written instructions for crocheting the Baby Carriage on pages 106-107 of Cute Crochet World.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

Even though you begin the Baby Carriage with a chain loop, work the pattern in rows. At the end of Row 1, the piece looks like this. The shaping is accomplished with stitches of different heights. Once you have finished the stitches of the row, ch 4 and turn.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

The first treble stitch of Row 2 goes into the first stitch of the previous row, because we are increasing on this row. So essentially, the first stitch has two stitches in it—the turning ch, which counts as the first tr and another tr. The pink dots show each stitch that you will work into. Some have two sts in them, some only have one.

Find help making treble sts on YouTube. Go to Crochet Spot for instructions on making the htr (half treble).

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

When you’re finished with Row 2, the piece looks like this. The hood and bed are curved, because you increased in those areas. The bottom of the carriage is flat, because you used short stitches and you didn’t increase.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

Once again, after you ch 3 and turn, work the first dc into the first stitch as instructed in the pattern and shown in this photo. Then work around as noted in the pattern.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

When Row 3 is done, you have the shape of the baby carriage.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

Row 4 adds the handle. To make lovely edges, you will be slip stitching along the top of the bed and the edge of the hood, as shown in the picture. To finish this piece beautifully, stop your slip stitches at the 2nd st of the turning ch-3 at the beginning of Row 3. Cut the yarn and pull the end of the yarn out of the last sl st.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

Skip the 3rd st of the turning ch of Row 3, bring needle under the chain of the next stitch as shown in the photo.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

Insert the needle into the top of the last sl st, bringing it out toward the back of the piece. Adjust the stitch you just made to be the same size as the rest of the sl sts.

Step-by-step photos for crocheted baby carriage

Weave the yarn end in at the back of the work. Add wheels and you’re done!

Step-by-Step Byzantine Beauty

Saturday, June 7th, 2014


Thank you to Johanna from Bavaria, who asked for help with the Byzantine Beauty (pages 66-67 of Crochet Garden). I hope these step-by-step photos will help.

The Byzantine Beauty begins with a ring of chain stitches, worked with a waste yarn This piece helps keep the petals in place. You will remove the waste yarn when the flower is almost finished.

When Petal Round 1, Row 1 is complete, it looks like this. It is attached to the ring in three places.

Here, Petal Round 1, Row 2 is finished.

Petal Round 1, Row 3 includes decreases and increases to shape the petals.

This shows the beginning of Petal Round 2, Row 2. You begin the row by single-crocheting in the first 6 sts. To begin a row with sc, start with a slip-knot on your hook, insert hook into first stitch, and draw up a loop. Yarn-over and finish the sc as usual.

When you are finished with Petal Round 1, Petal Round 2, the Inner Ring, and the optional Outer Ring, you are ready to put the flower together.

Weave Petal Round 2 under and over the petals of Petal Round 1. In this photo, I have just started weaving under and over the first petal.

Notice how Petal Round 2 goes under and over the sides of each petal of Petal Round 1. When you finish weaving, sew the ends of Petal Round 2 together.

Adjust the petals so they are evenly spaced.

Do you see where the Petal Rounds cross each other? They cross at the center of the flower. Weave the Inner Ring outside of the crossed strands. Pay attention to how the strands cross.

The Inner Round is finished, and now it’s time to…

Cut away the waste yarn! Make sure you only snip the waste yarn.

That looks better! You can stop here or add another ring.

Weave Outer Ring, so that if the Inner Ring goes under the petal, the Outer Ring will go over the petal.

Sew the ends of the Outer Ring together, adjust the petals, and you’re finished!

Five Point Tutorial

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

A friend on Ravelry has been experimenting with Five Point, a flower design in Crochet Bouquet. She inspired me to re-crochet this cute flower and take some step-by-step photos. I hope this will encourage you to give “Five Point” a try.

The entire flower is worked in the round from the front only. Some of the photos show what the back looks like, but again, all rounds are worked from the front.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

Rnd 1 is pairs of dc separated by ch-spaces.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

Rnd 2 is worked in the ch-spaces of Rnd 1. The stitches are really packed in to make a densely packed petal.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

Rnd 3 is worked into the original ch-ring, but behind the petals of Rnd 2. Fold the petal toward you. Insert hook into the original ring from the front as you normally would. The instructions tell you exactly how to begin the round with a tr into the ring.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

This is how Rnd 3 looks as you progress around the flower, creating tr sts separated by ch-spaces.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

When Rnd 3 is finished, it looks like this from the front and from the back. Because of the way Rnd 3 is positioned, the points of Rnd 2 should be more-or-less between the arches of Rnd 4.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

The stitches of Rnd 4 are worked into the ch-spaces of Rnd 3. Again, a lot of stitches are packed into those ch-spaces. The points of Rnd 2 should be between the arches of Rnd 4. The yellow arrow shows where to insert your hook in Rnd 5, after you fold forward the petals of Rnd 4.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

Fold the petals of Rnd 4 toward you, insert hook between the petals of Rnd 2 (see the yellow arrow in the photo above). This round locks the petals into their correct alignment.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

This is how Rnd 5 looks from the back—sl sts between the petals of Rnd 2, separated by ch-spaces.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

Rnd 6 is worked into the ch-spaces of Rnd 5. Here are a couple of petals of Rnd 6, as viewed from the back side.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

Rnd 6 is finished, and we’re ready for one more round.

Crocheted Five Point flower tutorial

The Five Point is finished! The colors remind me of Valentine’s Day. It will be here before we know it!

Paired Leaflet Frond Tutorial

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Paired Leaflet Frond from Crochet Garden

Hello to Jan G. and her Knitwits group! Jan asked for a tutorial about the Paired Leaflet Frond, which is part of the “Trillium and Fronds” pattern (pp. 126-127) in Crochet Garden. Thank you for asking!

The Paired Leaflet Frond’s delicate construction is worked from the top down, opposite of how we know a frond or vine grows. It has a single top leaf, which you can see on page 16, where the Paired Leaflet Frond is featured in the section on Steam Blocking. In the rest of the book, we used it as a stem, so the flowers are hiding the top leaf.

Paired Leaflet Frond, Photo A

Reminder: In Crochet Garden, when you see a list of stitches, you are meant to put each stitch in the next st of the row below, unless otherwise instructed. For instance,

“2 hdc, sc, sl st” means

“hdc in next 2 sts, sc in next st, sl st in next st”

Once you have finished the top leaf, *ch 15.

To make the first leaflet of a pair, sc in 3rd ch from hook, hdc in next 2 sts, 3 sc in next st. Those last 3 sts are going to cause this leaflet to bend back in the direction of the top leaf.

Paired Leaflet Frond, Photo A2

For most crocheters, this will be the left-hand leaflet. Photo A shows the frond up to this point. The arrow points to the st with 3 sc in it.

Now for the second leaflet: ch 6 (see Photo A2), sc in 3rd ch from hook (arrow in Photo A2), hdc2tog over the next 2 ch-sts, sc in next ch, sl st in the same st as the 3 sc from the first leaflet. This stitch will be stretched out, so you should be able to see it well.

Paired Leaflet Frond, Photo B

Photo B shows the completed second leaflet. That last sl st is on the hook.

Here’s the tricky part. You need to turn the paired leaflets so that their base is up, their tips pointing away from the hook. When I rotate them counter-clockwise (the direction of the arrow in Photo B), everything comes out in the right places: the top leaf hangs away from the hook, the yarn is behind the work and the hook in the proper working position.

Paired Leaflet Frond, Photo C

Now yarn over (see Photo C, where you can see the tips of the leaf pair pointing away from the hook).

Pull the yarn through the st on the hook. The new stitch you create will show between the two leaflets (see Photo D, where the arrow points at this stitch). Now you are in the correct position to start again at the * and make as many leaflet pairs as you like.

Paired Leaflet Frond, Photo D

You can make the distance between the leaflet pairs shorter or longer by chaining less or more than 15 sts at the beginning of each repeat.

Hope this helps, Jan!

Curly Ray Sunflower Crochet Along and Give-Away!

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

Let’s celebrate these last weeks of summer in the Northern Hemisphere by crocheting a Curly Ray Sunflower (pages 54-55 of Crochet Garden). And if you’re anticipating the end of winter in the Southern Hemisphere—this flower will brighten your day!

Curly Ray Sunflower from Crochet Garden

I’m giving away the three Curly Ray Sunflowers shown on this page. Simply leave a comment on this blog post OR on my Crochet Garden page on Facebook by September 1, 2012 to be entered into the drawing. I’ll draw three names, and send one flower to each person whose name was drawn. Good luck!

The petals of Curly Ray Sunflower are attached to each other as you crochet them. Lori, a Crochet Garden reader, asked for help with the joining instructions. I promised to post step-by-step photos that show how to join Curly Ray’s petals successfully. Here they are:

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 1: the first petal of Round 5 is finished. The pink arrow points to the back loop of the final dc of the row, where you will be joining the next petal. The yellow arrow points to the 5th sc of the petal, which you’ll need to find after completing all the petals.

Move on to the next petal with ch 8. In the 2nd ch from hook, (3 sc). In the next ch-stitch, you will make 3 stitches, which will be inside the bold parentheses here: (sc,

fold the ch and the yarn to the front of your work, so your hook is behind them.

Insert your hook into the back loop of the final dc of the previous petal, shown by pink arrow in Photo 1. You have to kind of reach backwards to do this. Now you have two loops on the hook.

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 2: Insert hook into the ch and draw up a loop—that will be the loop the yellow arrow points to.

Now you have 3 loops on the hook. The pink arrow points to the original loop on your hook. The blue arrow is the back loop of the final dc of the previous petal.

Yarn over and draw through all 3 loops to complete an sc.

Finally, hdc into the same ch-st.)

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 3: Now you have 3 sts in the 3rd ch. Take a moment to sort everything out—find the chain and notice that you have 5 ch sts remaining.

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 4: Finish the petal as instructed in the directions. You will be using the htr or half-treble crochet. Find the htr’s history and how-to on page 12 of Crochet Garden.

Crochet 9 more petals around the flower, just as you did the previous petal, joining as you go.

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 5: Petal 12 is the same as petal 11 (not petal 17 as printed in the instructions), only you stop after completing the last tr. Cut the yarn and pull the loop until the cut end comes out of the top of the stitch. Thread the yarn into a tapestry needle.

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 6: Needle-join by stitching around the very first sl st of the round. In Photo 6, you can see how the thread comes from the top of the tr and goes around the base of the first petal. Thread the needle back down into the top of the tr to complete a needle-join.

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step

Photo 7: Now thread the needle up the back of Petal 12, until you come to the final dc of that petal. The blue arrow shows how the needle is coming out of the back loop of the final dc of petal 12.

Photo 8: Find the 5th sc of petal 1 (go back to Photo 1—it’s the stitch the yellow arrow points to). Stitch into the back of this sc, then stitch into Petal 12 again to join the first petal to the last petal.

Curly Ray Sunflower step-by-step