Posts Tagged ‘tutorial’

Hints for Crocheting the Horse Chestnut Leaf

Monday, July 18th, 2016

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

Horse chestnuts! They’re such cool trees, and I would never have known about them if we hadn’t moved to England. Their flowers are fancy and frilly, and they produce very hard nuts. Their leaves inspired the “Horse Chestnut Leaf” design in Cute Crochet World (pages 74-75).

The pretty “Chestnut Wrap” in the Fall 2016 issue of Love of Crochet features a trim made with joined Horse Chestnut Leaves. The magazine will be available on the newsstand in August. You can purchase the digital edition now at www.interweavestore.com/love-of-crochet-magazine-fall-2016-digital-edition.

Here are some step-by-step photos to help you visualize the instructions in the book. I’ve made two small improvements that will make the leaf easier to make.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

Row 1 of the Horse Chestnut Leaf sets up the central veins for the five leaflets or lobes. Very easy. When you’re done, ch 1 and turn. In the original pattern, I didn’t include the ch-1, because you don’t really need it. However, the ch-1 makes it slightly easier to turn.
Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

On Row 2, you’ll run into two unusual stitches. Find instructions for the htr (U.S. half double treble) here. The other is the stitch-top picot. I believe it leaves less of a gap between the stitches on either side of it. To make the st-top picot, ch 3,

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

…insert hook into the Front Loop of the previous stitch and under the loop that lies just next to it as in the photo above, yo and draw through all lps on hook.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

St-top picot complete.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

In Cute Crochet World, at the end of the first four lobes, the instructions say “rotate piece so you are looking at the base of the lobe, sl st around the sl st at ase of lobe,…” Instead of doing that, simply sl st in the space between the lobe you just finished and the next lobe. The photo above shows where to place the hook.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

Row 3 is worked along the base of the lobes. The instructions take you through how to do each stitch. If it helps, think of it this way, sc-3dc-sc-together.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

After the final yo and pull through all loops on hook, the base of the leaf pulls together and looks like this.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

The very best way to finish the leaf is to needle-join the stem to the base of Lobe 5. After the last stitch of the stem, cut the yarn and pull the hook straight up from the last stitch. The end of the yarn will pull out of the top of the last stitch.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

Thread the yarn end into a needle. Take the needle under the first sl st of Lobe 5, Row 2.

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

Then take the needle back into the top of the final stem stitch (the yarn is coming out of this stitch).

Crocheted Horse Chestnut Leaf Tutorial

On the needle’s way down, catch the loop at the back of the leaf—see the photo above. Pull the thread through, adjust the new loop to a good tension, and weave in the end.

Hints for Making “Wiener Dog” from Cute Crochet World

Sunday, February 21st, 2016

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Complete written instructions for the Wiener Dog are on pages 40-41 of Cute Crochet World. These photos and hints will help you have a successful doxie crochet experience.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Strange as it may seem at first glance, the Wiener Dog is crocheted in three rounds. The first round makes the shoulder and chest of the dog, while the second begins the head and body. The second round also makes the front leg. The nose, tail, and back leg are finished in Round 3.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Here, Rnd 1 is finished and the head and ear are started. The notes and arrows in the photos should help you with stitch placement as you follow the instructions in the book.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

The body starts as a long chain. Work back along the chain and then attach to Rnd 1.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

This is the end of Rnd 2, with the front leg complete. The arrows show where to begin Rnd 3.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

The nose starts as a chain. Work back along the chain and attach to Rnd 2, as shown.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

To start “Ear and back of neck” in the pattern: fold or move the ear out of the way to the back, sc in next stitch of head, which is beyond the ear.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Keeping your hook and yarn out of the way, fold the ear down to the right side. Insert the hook in the marked stitch, insert the hook into the next st of the head, yo and draw through all loops on hook.

The pattern notes “(sc2tog made),” but this is wrong! Please delete that phrase. To make myself feel better about this, I checked my original manuscript—it wasn’t there! Yay! But I obviously missed it when proofreading. Aw man!

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Now we’re at “Back and tail.” The dots show where to place the stitches along the back. They are worked into the free loops of the foundation chain. Be sure you start in the correct loop (it will have a htr in it already from Rnd 2 (htr instructions here LINK).

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

“Back and tail” are done. The reason the tail curves, is because you work 2 sl sts into one of the chains.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

This doggy’s hind leg is shaped in one row. You chain, make a picot, decrease to make the foot. The photo shows the next decrease, which forms the ankle.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

When the hind leg is finished, you skip one st of the body and sl st in the next st. The photo should help clear any confusion about which stitch is which.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

The best way to end a motif like this is with a needle-join. When the chest is finished, cut the yarn and pull the hook straight up from the final stitch. The end of the yarn will come out at the top of the last st.

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Thread the yarn end into a needle, take the needle around the stitch at the base of the front leg and back down into the final stitch of Rnd 3. At the back, catch another loop, like this:

Crocheted Dachshund Tutorial

Adjust the new loop to look its best, weave in the end, block, and you’re done!

Need a bone for your new Wiener Dog? Pattern in the next post.

Hints for Making “Mamas and Papas,” Part 3 of 3–Arms and Hands

Friday, February 19th, 2016

The Mamas and Papas’ arms and hands are pretty simple to crochet, once you decide exactly what you want. The sidebar “Arms” on page 141 of Cute Crochet World gives some general hints. Specific instructions for Mama’s arms begin on page 139, and Papa’s arms are on page 141.

Where you place the arm on each sleeve changes the gesture of the person. An arm high on the sleeve is waving, while an arm low on the sleeve is at rest at the person’s side.

The other decision to make is whether the arm is “hand first” or “thumb first.” When you make any arm, you make a chain. As you work back along the chain to finish the arm, “hand first” means you will crochet the hand first; and “thumb first” means the thumb will be completed first. Let’s look at a few examples.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

I crocheted Lio’s left arm at the side of the sleeve, so he looks like he’s welcoming someone or about to pat someone on the back. This arm is “hand first,” because after making the initial chain, the hand is the first thing you make, and then the thumb. This arm is slightly bent, because of one decrease at the elbow—this option is given in the instructions.

Lio’s right arm hangs straight and relaxed at his side, crocheted onto the bottom of the sleeve. This arm is also “hand first.”

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Irene’s left arm, crocheted into the side of her sleeve, is waving and “hand first.” Her right arm is by her side, “thumb first,” and bent.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Nils’s left arm hangs straight by his side, “hand first.” His right arm is waving, attached to the top of his sleeve, “thumb first.”

Can you figure out which comes first–the hand or the thumb—for Rog and Pam? (Answer below the photos.)

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

ANSWER: Rog and Pam’s left arms: “hand first;” and their right arms: “thumb first.”

You can plan this all before you start, or you can test different arms to get a better idea of how they will look. Just crochet a couple of thumb-first and hand-first arms, bent and straight. Instead of drawing up a loop in the sleeve, just begin with a slip knot on your hook.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Now you can test different arm positions before you commit. The arms are made with so few stitches, it won’t take long to take this option.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

For the new Mama and Papa, I wanted to arrange their arms so her right hand could hold his left hand. She would wave with her left arm, and his right arm would be relaxed at his side.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s left arm is bent with “hand first” and her right arm is “thumb first.” Papa’s left arm is “thumb first” and his right is “hand first.” And here they are!

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

* * * * * *

One more thing. Rog and Pam have travelled with me several places for photography. They weren’t strong enough to stand on important tourist landmarks, so I stabilized them with felt. You may consider doing this, if you’re thinking of making Mamas and Papas for toys.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Hints for Making the Mamas and Papas of Cute Crochet World, Part 2 of 3

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Start Mama’s legs and Papa’s trousers by drawing up a loop in the lower edge of the dress or shirt. The instructions say “join with a sl st,” which to my mind (at the time I wrote the instructions) meant the same thing. “Draw up a loop” is a better way to say what I meant.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Chain as instructed, and then work back along the chain to create the leg.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s feet are shaped by increasing or decreasing at the heel, and her slender ankles are sc, while her shapely calves are hdc.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

The shoe on this foot begins at the toe. The shoe on the other foot begins at the heel. You’ll see as you follow the directions, why this is.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s legs are worked separately.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

To start Papa’s trousers, draw up a loop in the appropriate stitch at the lower edge of Papa’s shirt. Chain and then work back along the chain to make the first trouser leg. Row 2 is only two sc, which serve to join the trouser legs. From the last sc, chain out again (photo shows how he looks at this point), work back along the chain to create the second trouser leg, and join to the shirt.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Use one of the yarn ends to sew the last dc of the legs to the edge of the shirt. I wove my needle back and forth to catch loops from the legs and the shirt, as in the photo above. I pulled the yarn end through and wove it in a different direction to make sure it wouldn’t come loose.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Papa’s shoes are worked into the turning ch at the end of the trouser legs. Take a moment to find the four ch-sts of each turning ch before you start. The photo shows how first shoe begins with drawing up a loop in the first ch of the ch4-loop. The blue dots indicate the second, third, and fourth ch-sts.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

The second shoe begins with hdc in the second ch of the ch4-loop. To begin with hdc, place a slip knot on your hook, yo, hold these loops in place with your fingers, draw up a loop in the second ch, yo, and complete the st as you would any hdc.

The blue dots show each of the four ch-sts. The black stitch is in the second ch.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama and Papa are ready for arms. There’s lots of choice with arms—waving, expansive, relaxed. What will I choose? Maybe a little of each, so you can see how to make them in the next post.

Hints for Making the Mamas and Papas of Cute Crochet World, Part 1 of 3

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Crocheted Mamas and Papas

I’m so glad reader and crocheter Janet S. asked for a little help with the Mamas and Papas of Cute Crochet World. She is using them to decorate crocheted bags.

Complete written instructions for the Mamas and Papas are on pages 137-141. The hair, clothing, arms, and legs are joined as you work. I like to weave in ends as I go.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Begin with the head. It is worked in the round, but it is oval because the stitches on the sides are shorter than the stitches at the top of the head and the chin. The tallest stitch is htr; find directions for htr here.

After you join the first round for the head, the neck is simply the first few stitches of a second round.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mamas and Papas have lots of hairstyles to choose from, with instructions for each on page 140. I’m giving this Mama a Cleopatra hairdo, which starts in the second stitch from the neck. You can see how I skipped the first stitch, and I’ve joined the hair color with a tr.

To join with a tr (instead of a sl st and ch 4), place a slip knot on the hook. Holding the knot in place with the fingers on your hook-holding hand, yo twice, insert the hook, and pull up a loop. Now you have 4 loops on the hook, so finish the stitch just like any tr.

Once you get the hang of beginning a row or round with a stitch (instead of sl st and chain), I think you’ll like it a lot. It looks neater than the sl st and chain at the beginning.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama has the Cleopatra hair and Papa has a crew cut.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Turn Mama to the wrong side to start the dress. Work the first row into the three stitches of the neck. In the photo above, I have joined the dress color with 4 dc in the first stitch. The next two stitches are marked with arrows.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Mama’s rounded sleeves are made with two clusters of 4 tr. The instructions tell you exactly how to do this. In this photo, I am at the top of page 139. I have 5 loops on the hook and I’m ready to yo and pull through all loops to complete the first 4tr-cluster.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

The first row of Papa’s shirt is similar to the first row of Mama’s dress—begin on the wrong side. The green arrow in this photo shows the beginning of the second row, where we make the sleeves. Ch 4 at the beginning of the row, then make a joined-tr. A joined-tr is attached to the chain, and keeps it from gapping.

To make the joined-tr for Papa’s shirt, Yo, draw up a loop in the 3rd ch from hook, draw up a loop in the first st. Now you have 4 loops on the hook, and you can finish this tr just like any other tr.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

End off after the first two rows of the dress or shirt. Weave in ends to get them out of the way. To finish the garments, turn to the wrong side and place the first sts into the sts shown by the green arrows.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

To keep the turning chains in Mama’s dress and Papa’s shirt from creating gaps, use a joined-dc. Instructions for that are on page 17.

Crocheted Mamas and Papas Tutorial

When the dress and shirt are finished, they’ll look like this. We’ll crochet legs and shoes in the next post.

Gingerbread Kids from Cute Crochet World–Hints and Ideas

Friday, December 18th, 2015

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Why in the world do we need another pattern for crocheted gingerbread people? Because I’m terrible at crocheting into the sides of rows. Read the whole story on this Flashback Friday on my other blog, Suzann’s TextileFusion.

The Gingerbread Kids of Cute Crochet World are worked in the round, so when you finish, you have an easy time adding icing trim. Here are step-by-step photos of the Gingerbread Kids in progress.

Complete written instructions for the Gingerbread Kids are on pages 80-82 of Cute Crochet World: A Little Dictionary of Crocheted Critters, Folks, Food & More.

Both Gingerbread Kids are made in two rounds of gingerbread and one round of icing. For clarity, the book’s instructions for each gingerbread round are divided into sections for arms, legs, and head. As you work, observe how the stitches look and where they are.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Here is the first arm, head, and second arm of Rnd 1, to the point after “sc in each of the next 4 ch.” The yellow marks show where to draw up lps for the next stitch—draw up two loops, yo, then draw up the third.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

And here are the loops on the hook, ready for the last yo and pull through. This joins the arms and head.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Create the body- and leg-shaping by increasing or decreasing sts. When it’s done, Rnd 1 looks like a curled up stick figure.

Rnd 2 is worked in every single st, foundation ch, and ch-2 lp of Rnd 1. A helpful hint: after stitching the ends of the legs, head, and arms in the ch-2 lp, the instructions say to “skip the first sc” or “hdc.” That st is probably already obscured by the sts in the ch-2 lp.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

At the last st of Rnd 2, cut the yarn and pull the final loop up, up, and out of the last st, as in the photo above.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Thread the yarn end into a tapestry needle, and skim the needle under the top two loops of the first st of the rnd, as in this photo. Take the needle back down into the last st of the round, tighten and adjust the new loop, weave in end. This is a needle-join or invisible join, which you can read more about here.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Start the round of icing trim by drawing up a loop with the icing color yarn. Sl st in each st around, making sts looser or tighter to fit the outline of the gingerbread.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

When you’ve slip stitched around, cut yarn and draw the last loop completely out of the final st. Thread yarn end into tapestry needle.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Skim the needle under the two “legs” of the loop you drew up at the beginning of the round.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Take the needle back down into the final st of the round, where the yarn end emerges. Pull the yarn end through to the wrong side, adjust it to the size of the sl sts nearby, weave in end. Another needle join complete!

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

The icing trim on the gingerbread girl is slightly different. Sl st around her right leg first and pull the yarn ends to the wrong side. Following the complete instructions in the book, sl st around the second leg and around the edge until you come to the second corner of the skirt. Hold the yarn in back as you sl st across the tops of the legs/bottom edge of the skirt.
.
Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

When you’re to the last possible stitch before the opposite corner of the skirt, cut yarn and draw the end up and out of the final stitch. This photo shows the loop in the process of being drawn out.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Thread the yarn end into a tapestry needle. Skim the needle under the first stitch of the skirt.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Take the needle back down into the final sl st of the trim. Adjust the loop, weave in the end on the wrong side. Another needle join complete!

Make a Gingerbread Kid Ornament

To make ornaments, crochet two each of the gingerbread boy and gingerbread girl. Make a hanging loop for each ornament. from the instructions here. I used a length of No. 10 crochet cotton, but you can use embroidery floss or the yarn you used to make the gingerbread motifs.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

For each ornament, sew the hanging loop to the wrong side of one motif, centering it at the top of the head. I used a contrasting color thread here, so you can easily see it. You can use whatever yarn or thread works.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Line up two matching motifs, wrong sides together. Use yarn to sew the motifs together, stitching each loop of the final round of the gingerbread kid to the matching stitch on the other motif. Basically, you will whip-stitch the pieces together. Weave the final end between the motifs.

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament Tutorial

Sewing the matching motifs together, back to back, tames the tendency of the crochet to curl. Best of all, your ornament will look nice from both sides. And you made it!

Crocheted Gingerbread Kid Ornament from Cute Crochet World

Crochet a Book for Book Lover’s Day!

Sunday, August 9th, 2015

Small Crocheted Book Tutorial

Book lovers, this is your special day! Holiday Insights, my go-to site for information on interesting holidays, doesn’t list a founder or group which sponsors Book Lover’s Day. In fact, some controversy exists about the true date of Book Lover’s Day—August 9th or first Saturday of November?

The answer doesn’t matter, because to me, every day is Book Lover’s Day. But I’m glad to have a reason to post a photo-tutorial for the “Little Square Book” on pages 120-121 of Cute Crochet World.

These photos and notes are to supplement the printed instructions.

The pages and covers of the Little Square Book are made with two rounds. In the second round, the corners have a lot of stitches in them. Working between the corners in Rnd 2, you hdc or dc in the next three sts. To do this, you must pull back the corner stitches to reveal the first of the three stitches in which you must place a hdc or dc.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

When the pages are finished and blocked, stack them as follows: back cover wrong side up, 3 pages, right side up, front cover right side up.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

To bind the pages and covers together, place a slip knot on you hook, and insert hook into ch-2 sp at corner of front cover, 3 pages, and back cover, yo (see Photo 2). Draw the yo through all the pages and through the loop on the hook.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

Photo 3 shows the hook inserted into each cover and page, ready for the next stitch: insert hook in next dc of front cover, next hdc of each page, and next dc of back cover. Yo and complete a sl st, drawing the yarn far enough up to allow the pages to assume their natural thickness.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

When you are finished with the binding, the book will look like the one in Photo 4.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

Now it’s time to crochet the book’s spine. Place the first st into the ch2-sp of the front cover, shown by the yellow arrow at right. Sk the next sl st. Sc into each of the next 7 sl sts shown by the yellow lines. Finally, sc into the ch2-sp at the other end of the front cover. This row is worked only the stitches of the front cover, and the sl sts made when you bound the book.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

Here is the first row of the book’s spine, finished.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

The spine is 3 rows of crochet. Bend the spine around the end of the book, then sew in place to the back cover. Weave in ends.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

This book is the perfect journal for the tiny writer. Decorate with beads or embroidery, write on tiny scraps of fabric and sew them to the pages. Enjoy Book Lover’s Day.

Little Square Book crochet tutorial

The Little Square Book, with its heart on its cover, visits with books by some of my favorite authors: Barbara G. Walker, Carl Jung, Terry Pratchett, and Erle Stanley Gardner, creator of Perry Mason.

Hints for Crocheting “Picot Mexico”

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

The colorful Picot Mexico flower looks happy and joyful to me, with its vibrant colors. It is on pages 102-103 of Crochet Garden: Bunches of Flowers, Leaves, and Other Delights. You can also make Picot Mexico in one color of yarn.

First a correction to the book: Rnd 2 of the Small Flower (center column on page 103) refers twice to a “ch-3 sp.” It should read “ch-2 sp.”

And now, some hints for making Picot Mexico successfully. The sample is the Small Flower. but the hints apply to the Large Flower as well.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

To begin rnds 3 and 4, the instructions tell you to “join with *(BPdc around next dc…” This is almost the same as joining with a regular dc. Place a slip knot on your hook. Yarn over hook, holding the slip knot in place so the yo won’t twist away. (Photo 1)

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

For a Back Post dc, still holding the slip knot in place, insert hook from the back to the front of your work, between two dc-sts of the previous rnd. (Photo 2)

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

Passing hook in front of the next dc, insert hook to back again around that dc. (Photo 3)

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

Draw up a loop around the post of the previous rnd’s dc. If you’ve successfully held the slip knot in place, you’ll have 3 loops on the hook. Finish as you would finish any dc. (Photo 4) If the yo has twisted away, you may be able to get it back by twisting the slip knot around the hook.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

In Rnds 3 and 4, increase by placing two BPdc-sts around one dc-post. Photo 5 shows the wrong side of the work, where the first two “BPdc around next dc and sl st-picot” are complete. The white arrow points to the next BPdc, which is the first of two around the same post.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

The increase is complete in Photo 6. The white arrow shows the first BPdc around the post, and the pink arrow shows the second BPdc around the same post.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

A friend on Ravelry (www.ravelry.com) asked for a photo of the back of a flower she was working on. That was such a good idea! So here’s what the small Picot Mexico looks like from the back (Photo 7).


Tips for Making Picot Mexico with One Color

  • Don’t fasten off after Rnd 1. Instead, as you begin Rnd 2, ch 3 to replace the first dc of the rnd. At the end of Rnd 2, sl st in the 3rd ch of the ch 3 at the beg of the rnd.
  • You’ll still have to fasten off the yarn after Rnds 2 and 3, so you can get a fresh start with the BPdc on the next round.
  • Don’t fasten off after Rnd 5. You have already sl stitched into the first sc of Rnd 5, so that counts as the first sl st of Rnd 6. Ch 3 and tr in the same st as the sl st. Continue Rnd 6 as written.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

Millefiori from Crochet Bouquet Explained

Thursday, June 25th, 2015

Crocheted Millefiori Motifs

“Millefiori” on pages 25-26 of Crochet Bouquet: Easy Designs for Dozens of Flowers offers small flowers in five different petal shapes. Four of the petal styles are joined with a technique that gives an attractive and neat finish to warm the cockles of your crochet heart.

“Rounded Petals” is shown in the photos. In the book, patterns for “Pointy Petals,” “Rounded Petals,” “Baby Stars,” and “Heart-Shape Petals” should refer you to page 15 for finishing instructions.

Here’s how joining the petals works.

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

Following the instructions in Crochet Bouquet, crochet four or five petals in the shape of your choice (Photo A). When you’re done with the last sl st, cut the yarn, and pull the yarn straight up out of the last sl st.

The petals are numbered to keep track of them more easily.

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

Thread the final yarn end into a tapestry needle. Arrange the petals face-up. Beginning with petal 1, skim the needle under the visible loops of the first ch st of the petal and the final sl st of the petal as in Photo B.

When I say visible loops, I mean the ones you see as you look at right side of the petal. They are just one loop of the chain plus one loop of the sl st.

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

In Photo C, I have skimmed the needle under the first and last loops of petals 1, 2, and 3.

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

I pulled the yarn through the first three petals, and in Photo D, I’m skimming it under the loops of petals 4 and 5.

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

Tighten the yarn end to draw the petals together. Once again, skim the needle under the first loop of petal 1 as shown in Photo E.

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

Take the needle through the base of petal 1, from front (right side) to back (wrong side).

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

Tighten the yarn end once more, tack to secure the yarn, and weave in the end (Photo G).

Crochet Millefiori Motif Tutorial

If you haven’t already done so, weave in the end at the start of the flower. Take a moment to stretch the petals from side to side before blocking.

These are truly quick and easy flowers.

Crocheted Millefiori Motifs

Cute Crochet World Umbrella Tutorial

Saturday, June 6th, 2015

Crocheted Umbrella Motif

You probably heard about the rain we had in Texas over the last month. One big question at our house was, “Where did we put the umbrellas?” We haven’t really needed them for the past couple of years. I’m not convinced they would have kept anyone especially dry, with all the wind we had…

Considering the rain and hail and winds, it was much better to be inside crocheting an umbrella, rather than outside using one. This Umbrella is from Cute Crochet World, pages 78-79. Here are some tips and photos to supplement the instructions in the book.

crocheted leaf from Crochet Bouquet

Cute Crochet World’s Umbrella has a lot in common with the traditional Irish Crochet leaf (find instructions for this modified version in Crochet Bouquet: Easy Designs for Dozens of Flowers). You crochet them using a Turn-and-Twist method (my name for it). At the end of a row, you turn and crochet the first part of the next row. In the middle of the next row you rotate (or twist) the piece, work down the other side of the piece, then turn again to begin the next row. Confused? Here are pictures.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

Row 1 is finished in the photo above. It includes the U. S. htr stitch, which is a little taller than a dc and a little shorter than the tr. Read more about it here and here.

I put a safety pin on the right side of Row 1, so you can easily see when we’re turning for a new row as opposed to rotating or twisting in the middle of a row. After Row 1, TURN to begin Row 2.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

I am a few sts into Row 2 in this photo. The sts are worked into the Back Loop, which creates the ribbed look of the Umbrella. The arrow points to the ch-2 loop at the top of the umbrella. The dots show where to place the remaining sts of Row 2.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

Alright, in Photo 3, I’ve placed 3 sc into the ch-2 loop, ROTATED the piece, and I’m ready to crochet the rest of Row 2 into the foundation chain of Row 1.

Row 1 had 7 sts, and there’s a chain loop at the base of each of these sts. Those chain loops are where the remaining sts of Row 2 are worked. There is an increase still to go, so watch for it in the instructions. Don’t worry about crocheting into the back loop here, because there aren’t any true back loops.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

After Row 2, TURN to begin Row 3. The arrows show how the sts will go: across, over the top, ROTATE to work along the other side of the piece. All sts are worked into the Back Loop.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

Row 4 begins with a joined tr. You’ve probably noticed how the ch-4 turning ch of a tr row often flops around loosely at the start of the row. The joined tr solves the problem. The ch-4 turning chain is considered a tr-st, so it counts as the stitch in the first st of the row.

Photo 5 shows ch 4 (turning ch), yo, draw up a loop in 3rd ch from hook, draw up a loop in next st. The result is 4 loops on the hook, just like a regular tr. Work off the loops as you would for a tr.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

Row 3 is finished. See how crocheting into the Back Loops has created an impression of umbrella ribs? Now TURN to begin Row 4.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

In Photo 7, Row 4 is finished, and I have TURNED to begin Row 5. Row 5 starts with a ch-3 turning ch, which counts as the first stitch of the row, which we consider being placed into the first st of the previous row. Place the next dc of Row 5 into the next st.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

In Row 5, the ch-2 at the top of the umbrella creates a little bump. In the instructions, we’re at the middle column on page 79, where it says “Rotate piece to work points…” in the direction of the long arrow.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

As you finish Row 5, you’ll make the picot points of the umbrella into the sides of the sc-sts indicated by yellow dots. The magenta lines point to the sides of the long sts or turning-chains where you will place sl sts.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

Here’s the umbrella’s handle and point. Leave a long end for sewing.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

To place the umbrella point, insert your hook from right side to back through the ch 2 space of Row 5, then hook the tip of the umbrella point.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

With the point on the hook, pull the hook out of the ch 2 space, stopping just before the ends come through.

Crochet Umbrella Motif Tutorial

Arrange the handle to emerge from under the middle of the umbrella. Use the long sewing end to sew it in place on the wrong side of the umbrella.