Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

The Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit is the work of a group of five friends who get together once a week for quilting and crafting. We’ve picked our favorite quilts to display at the Clyde H. Wells Fine Arts Center Gallery, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Texas, through August 3, 2018.

You might be tempted to say “This is not your grandmother’s quilting.” The Dublin Rippers might reply, “Oh, this is definitely your grandmother’s quilting, and she was a lot more amazing than you realized.”

The group has been together since the early 2000s, and has been through changes as some members moved or passed away, and new members joined. I started showing up every week in 2011 (I think), when the group included Peggy DeLaVergne, the founder of the Rippers, Donna Timmons, our host, Hazel Ashcraft, and Sonja Banister.

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

The Dublin Rippers’ work reflects the larger quilt community, not only in our range of styles, but in the purpose we put our quilts to. Members make quilts for home, family and friends, group exchanges and raffles, for everyday use, and for art exhibits.

If you can, come and see the work of my friends Hazel Ashcraft and Donna Timmons, who carefully select patterns and add their personal style and color choices to make quilts that comfort family and friends. Hazel’s quilts are in the photo at the beginning of this post, and a detail from Donna’s hexie garden quilt, is at left.

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

Enjoy Sonja Banister’s work, which she offers for sale in her etsy.com shop, TwoOldeYoyos. I’m the very happy owner of two of Sonja’s flower basket quilts, at right. Tarleton featured her Texas-themed quilt in a press release for the exhibit.

When you visit the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit, you’ll see African-inspired quilts and more, by Peggy DeLaVergne, whose work has been honored with a solo exhibit at the annual International Quilt Festival in Houston. Peggy’s bulls-eye sunflower quilt, below, fills me with joy whenever I see it.

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

My own knitted, embellished quilts have been honored with a solo exhibit at International Quilt Festivals in Houston and Chicago. You’ll see them and the doily-inspired quilts from my Celebrate Doilies exhibit (below).

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

We are joined in this show by Elaine Fields Smith, author and ambassador for the 70273 Quilt Project. The double red xs on her quilt at left are meant to make people aware of the 70,273 people murdered by the Nazis in the 1940s, because they were mentally or physically disabled. From the website “The 70273 Project” we learn:

Though they never even laid eyes on the disabled person they were evaluating, the Nazi doctors read the medical files and, if from the words on the page, the person was deemed “unfit” or an “economic burden on society,” the doctor placed a red X at the bottom of the form. Three doctors were to read each medical file, and when two of them made a red X on the page, the disabled person’s fate was sealed. Most were murdered within hours.

For information about how you can take part in the 70273 Project, visit the 70273 website.

Scenes from the Dublin Rippers Quilt Exhibit

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