Tag Archives | flower

Curlicue Poncho Design in Love of Crochet

Love of Crochet, Curlicue Poncho

When I proposed the Curlicue Poncho for Love of Crochet magazine over a year ago, I thought it was a long shot.

What a happy surprise it was to receive the acceptance letter last spring!

Love of Crochet, Curlicue Poncho

Then the work began. Remind me never (almost never) to propose a garment in single crochet. It takes forever! But the result was worth it. I liked the finished product, and then when the magazine came out, I liked it even more because of the fantastic model, styling, and photography.

Always on the lookout for ways to promote my books, I used dark Curlicues and red Small Flowers from Crochet Garden to embellish the lower edge. There are so many ways to use crocheted flowers.

Love of Crochet, Curlicue Poncho

Here’s an in-progress shot of the Curlicue Poncho: blocking the curlicues and flowers. When you finish crocheting each one, leave a long yarn end for sewing. It saves weaving in extra ends AND they look very cool when you block them.

The photo in the screen shot above is copyright Love of Crochet. The Curlicue Poncho pattern is in Love of Crochet, Winter 2016 issue. For the moment, print copies of the magazine are still on the newsstand. You’ll be able to buy digital copies of the issue at the Interweave Store for a long, long time. Purchase the Curlicue Poncho Pattern here.

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Another Wall Hanging with Crocheted Flowers

Five Point crochet flower from Crochet Bouquet

The Five Point flower from pages 85–86 of Crochet Bouquet was perfect to embellish my latest wall hanging. The Five Points in the photo are made with Aunt Lydia’s No. 10 crochet cotton. They are really small and cute.

I’m making the wall hanging to enter in a juried show with an evolution theme.

You can crochet three different sizes of flowers from the Five Point pattern, one size growing out of the previous one. To me, that is a visual way to show how something might develop over time.

The quilt design also goes from plain to fancy, another sort of visual evolution. Here’s a peek at one of the steps in this wall hanging’s evolution.

Another TextileFusion wall hanging in the works

Find step-by-step photos and hints for crocheting the Five Point flower here.

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Open Studios at IQF-Chicago

I was happy this year to present three Open Studios sessions at the International Quilt Festival in Chicago. It’s great to talk to so many interested and enthusiastic people.

For “Quilting Sweater Knits” I hurried up and prepared two more minis in my Yellow Circle series.

 Open Studios—Quilting Sweater Knits  Open Studios—Quilting Sweater Knits

“Tropical Sunflower,” at left, was pieced and ready to quilt. For the one on the right, the pieces were pinned to the foundation but not yet sewn. I may name that one something like “Searchlight in a Blue Norther.”

 Open Studios—Quilting Sweater Knits

On the third yellow circle mini, closest to the viewer in this photo, I demonstrated how to piece knitted fabric onto a foundation.

 Open Studios—Flower Arranging for Quilters

On another day, we practiced “Flower Arranging for Quilters.” Two different groups of Open Studios participants came up with possibilities for my new wall hanging. I like this one a lot. I liked the other one a lot, too.

The wall hanging’s working title is “Blue Onion,” because the inspiration was my mother’s Zwiebelmuster or Onion Pattern china.

 Open Studios—Doilies in Your Quilts

Finally, I showed how to include doilies in quilts using several samples, including this new wall hanging, “Red Vases.”

Whew. That was a lot of prep. But it’s a good thing, because often the most difficult part of a project for me is starting it. True, I was going to start these projects eventually, but because of the Quilt Festival, they’re already begun.

Now all I have to do is finish them.

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Hints for Crocheting “Picot Mexico”

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

The colorful Picot Mexico flower looks happy and joyful to me, with its vibrant colors. It is on pages 102-103 of Crochet Garden: Bunches of Flowers, Leaves, and Other Delights. You can also make Picot Mexico in one color of yarn.

First a correction to the book: Rnd 2 of the Small Flower (center column on page 103) refers twice to a “ch-3 sp.” It should read “ch-2 sp.”

And now, some hints for making Picot Mexico successfully. The sample is the Small Flower. but the hints apply to the Large Flower as well.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

To begin rnds 3 and 4, the instructions tell you to “join with *(BPdc around next dc…” This is almost the same as joining with a regular dc. Place a slip knot on your hook. Yarn over hook, holding the slip knot in place so the yo won’t twist away. (Photo 1)

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

For a Back Post dc, still holding the slip knot in place, insert hook from the back to the front of your work, between two dc-sts of the previous rnd. (Photo 2)

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

Passing hook in front of the next dc, insert hook to back again around that dc. (Photo 3)

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

Draw up a loop around the post of the previous rnd’s dc. If you’ve successfully held the slip knot in place, you’ll have 3 loops on the hook. Finish as you would finish any dc. (Photo 4) If the yo has twisted away, you may be able to get it back by twisting the slip knot around the hook.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

In Rnds 3 and 4, increase by placing two BPdc-sts around one dc-post. Photo 5 shows the wrong side of the work, where the first two “BPdc around next dc and sl st-picot” are complete. The white arrow points to the next BPdc, which is the first of two around the same post.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

The increase is complete in Photo 6. The white arrow shows the first BPdc around the post, and the pink arrow shows the second BPdc around the same post.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

A friend on Ravelry (www.ravelry.com) asked for a photo of the back of a flower she was working on. That was such a good idea! So here’s what the small Picot Mexico looks like from the back (Photo 7).


Tips for Making Picot Mexico with One Color

  • Don’t fasten off after Rnd 1. Instead, as you begin Rnd 2, ch 3 to replace the first dc of the rnd. At the end of Rnd 2, sl st in the 3rd ch of the ch 3 at the beg of the rnd.
  • You’ll still have to fasten off the yarn after Rnds 2 and 3, so you can get a fresh start with the BPdc on the next round.
  • Don’t fasten off after Rnd 5. You have already sl stitched into the first sc of Rnd 5, so that counts as the first sl st of Rnd 6. Ch 3 and tr in the same st as the sl st. Continue Rnd 6 as written.

Crocheted Picot Mexico Flower Tutorial

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Step-by-Step Rafflesita–A Pattern Supplement

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

The Rafflesia is a great, big flower—about 3 feet across. It’s the inspiration for this tiny version, called “Rafflesita.” Because –ita means little. The pattern for “Rafflesita” is on pages 122-123 of Crochet Garden: Bunches of Flowers, Leaves, and Other Delights. These photos and notes are meant to supplement the instructions in the book. Thank you Kathleen, for asking about the instructions.

The samples in Crochet Garden are each crocheted from a single variegated yarn. These photos show a flower made with several colors, so you can see the different parts of the flower better. And besides, it looks pretty good.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Rnds 1 and 2 are straightforward rounds of double crochet. Rnd 3 is worked into the Front Loop (FL) Only of Rnd 2. It forms a support for the final round of the flower. Rnd 4 is worked into the Back Loop (BL) Only of Rnd 2. You will work the petals and the final round of the flower into Rnd 4.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Here’s the first petal done, and the second petal begun. This is the “ch 6” of 5A in the pattern. The chain takes you away from the flower center.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Continuing 5A, you work back toward the flower center, along the ch, and join to the BL of the next st of Rnd 4.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Instruction 5B has you stitching away from the flower again.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

And 5C has you coming back toward the center, and joining with a sl st in the BL of the next st of Rnd 4.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Crochet away from the flower in 5D.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Crochet back toward the center for 5E, but pay attention here, because you’re going to skip one st of Rnd 4, before joining with a sl st in the BL of the next st.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Back out one more time with 5F.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Toward the flower center one last time for 5G, and you’re done with the next petal.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

When the petals are complete, slip stitch around each petal as described in Rnd 6. If you find that 16 sl sts across the top are too many or too few, please alter the pattern to suit you.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

To begin Rnd 7 with a dc, place a slip knot on your hook (as if you were starting a new project), yo hook, and draw up a loop in any FL of Rnd 4. Now you have 3 loops on the hook. Finish the dc as usual.

The FLs of Rnd 4 are pretty easy to see in this photo. They are the line of loops just inside the petal row.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Rnd 7 is worked from the top of the flower. If you’re a right-handed crocheter (meaning you hold the hook in your right hand—doesn’t matter which hand you write with), proceed in the direction of the arrow in this picture.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

For me, it was easiest to fold the petals back and hold them with my thumb.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

When you’re finished with Rnd 7, cut the yarn and pull the final loop out of the top of the last st (A in photo). Thread the yarn into a needle, and take the needle under the top lps of the 2nd st of the rnd (B in photo).

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Take the needle down into the top of the final stitch, where the arrow is pointing in the photo. Tighten the loop to make it the same tension as the other stitches. Weave in the ends.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

Rafflesita’s center is like a little bowl, where you can store small things, like these fossils.

Crocheted Rafflesia Flower Tutorial

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Mark Your Calendars for Great Crochet!

We have a lot to celebrate on March 17 this year. We’ll wear green or maybe drink green beverages in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. Then we can mosey down to the nearest newsstand for a copy of the Spring 2015 issue of Interweave Crochet.

Interweave Crochet, Spring 2015

(Photo credit: Interweave Crochet/Harper Point Photography)

One of my career goals has been to publish a design in Interweave Crochet. Well, this is it! My crochet charm lace Dogwood Scarf appears in this issue. And here’s the best part: it’s on the cover.

I hope you’ll buy a copy, because it has lots more great crochet designs in it. Or better yet, subscribe. Find more information here: Interweave Crochet, Spring 2015.

Find a photo-tutorial for the Dogwood flower at http://www.textilefusion.com/bookblog/?p=892

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Step-by-Step Forget Me Not

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Today is National Forget-Me-Not Day! Who knew? Many thanks to Vintage Bell Broken China Jewelry, whom I follow on Facebook, for bringing this to my attention! National Forget-Me-Not Day reminds us to get in touch with friends and relatives that we don’t see very often.

National Forget-Me-Not Day has nothing to do with flowers, but what better day to bring you a tutorial for the Forget Me Not flower on pages 86-87 of Crochet Garden? You’ll need a small amount of yellow yarn for the center, white or very light blue for Rnd 2, and sky blue for the petals.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Rnd 1 is the brilliant yellow, single crochet center of the flower. Rnd 2 tells you to join the next color “with dc in FL of any st of rnd 1.” To join with a double crochet, place a slip knot on your hook and yarn over. Holding the yo in place on the hook, insert hook into the front loop of any stitch of Rnd 1.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Draw up a loop (as in photo). Now you have three loops on your hook, which is exactly what you need to finish the double crochet. Work the rest of the stitches of Rnd 2 in the front loops only of Rnd 1.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Here’s Rnd 2 all finished, with the yarn ends woven in. Do you see the stitches of Rnd 1 that have no stitches of Rnd 2 in them? We’re going to call those “free sc”s.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Rnd 3 is worked in the back loops of the stitches of Rnd 1, so you need to fold Rnd 2 to the front, completely out of the way, and insert your hook behind Rnd 2 into the back loops of Rnd 1. The first stitch of Rnd 3 goes in any “free sc” of Rnd 1.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

When you’re finished with Rnd 3, it looks like this from the front…

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

…and like this from the back, for a total of 15 sc.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Rnd 4 begins with ch 1, and then a sc in the first “free sc” of Rnd 1. The sc will seem fat and tall, because it is created around the sc of Rnd 3, and the ch of Round 2 at that point. Both those stitches will be hidden from view by this new sc.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Now it’s time for a little multitasking. Work the next three stitches by inserting your hook into the next chain space of Rnd 2 AND also in the next sc of Rnd 3. The ch-sts of Rnd 2 will be hidden inside these three sts.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

The next two sts go into the next tr of Rnd 2. Ah, simple.

Crocheted Forget Me Not Flower Tutorial

Once again, you’ll be multitasking for the next three sts. They are worked into the next ch-sp of Rnd 2, AND in the next st of Rnd 3.

Whew! Done with one petal and ready to start the next petal with sc in the next free sc of Rnd 1. Four more petals, and you’re done!

I added some Ladder Leaves (page 71 of Crochet Garden) and filler motifs to my little Forget Me Nots, to create this piece of Crochet Charm Lace.

Crochet Charm Lace with Forget Me Not Flower

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Firewheel Meadow Finished in Time

Firewheel Meadow wall hanging

I wish September began with a P, so we could use it in this catchy name: Productive Peptember. Okay, I’m laughing, because it looks so funny in print. Microsoft Word doesn’t have a synonym for “productive” that begins with S, so I’m off to the true synonym master, Roget…

No joy from Roget’s Thesaurus, either. So let’s say that I got a lot done in September: two magazine articles and one magazine design, which I’ll tell you about when they appear.

AND the Firewheel Meadow wall hanging, which I have been posting about in progress. The last stitch was secured on September 30, the day before it was due at the Threads of Texas Quilt Show.

And I’m so glad it was done in time, because it won third place in the Mixed Media, Small Quilt division. Yay!

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Step-by-Step Crocheted Dogwood Flower

Crocheted Dogwood Flower

Blooming dogwood is beautiful sign of spring!

Dogwood trees don’t grow in our part of Texas, so I studied photos of dogwood flowers, in hopes of including the pattern for one in Crochet Garden: Bunches of Flowers, Leaves, and Other Delights. Shaping the petal correctly was a challenge, but adding the dark notch at the petal end stumped me…for a while.

Crochet your own dogwood blossoms with the instructions found on pages 40-41 of Crochet Garden. I hope you enjoy making a tree-full! These step-by-step photos should help.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Each petal is made with three rows of crochet. To make the curved end at Row 1, you will “hdc-dc-htr-tog across the 3rd, 4th, and 5th ch from hook.” Let’s break that down:

  • Yo, draw up a loop in the 3rd ch from hook (3 lps on hook).
  • Yo, draw up a loop in the next ch, yo, draw through 2 loops (4 lps on hook).
  • Yo twice, draw up a loop in the next ch, yo, draw through 2 loops (6 lps on hook).

The photo shows how the decrease looks at this point. Now you’re ready to finish off this decrease: yo and pull through all lps on hook.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Finish Row 1, using decreases and different heights of stitches as instructed. This photo shows Row 1 finished, just before turning.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Here’s where we introduce the accent color, which will comprise the dark notch at the end of the petal. For the first petal, leave a reasonable-length yarn end, and begin crocheting over the accent color with the original yarn. As you crochet Row 2, you are looking at the wrong side of the petal.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

When the final dc of Row 2 is done, drop the main petal yarn, remove the hook from the loop and enlarge the loop, so it won’t come unraveled as you do the next few steps. Turn back to the right side of the petal. Find the stitch in which you made the dc. Then go to the next st of Row 1, and insert the hook in that stitch, as in the photo.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

To make the dark notch in the petal, yo with the accent color and draw through the stitch. With the accent color, make 2 slip sts in the side of the dc of Row 2. It’s right there, where you need it. You’ll easily be able to find 2 loops on the side of this stitch. Drop the accent color.

Insert your hook into the enlarged loop that you dropped earlier. Tighten the loop. You’ll have 2 loops on the hook, as you see in the photo above.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

With the main color, chain 1, drawing the loop through both loops on the hook. Then chain as instructed for Row 3.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Remember how you decreased three stitches to make the curve on Row 1 of the petal? To make the mirror-image curve on this side of the petal, you do the opposite: increase by placing 3 stitches into the 3rd chain from the hook.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

As you crochet Row 3, watch for the instruction to begin crocheting over the accent color again. That will bring it back down to the center of the flower, where it will be ready for the next petal.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Cut a 1/2″/1.3cm strip of stiff card to make the loopy center of the flower. I cut mine from a cereal box. Wrap the accent yarn carefully around the paper strip. Placing the wraps next to each other will make them all the same size. Insert your threaded tapestry needle under the wraps.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Pull the thread under the wraps, remove the needle, tie the ends of the thread as tightly as you can to hold the wraps. Remove the cardboard and tighten the knot.

Crocheted Dogwood Flower Photo Tutorial

Tie the yarn ends again to lock the knot in place. Use the ends to sew this piece onto the flower. For the wrap ends, you can trim them and hide them among the loops, or you can bring them to the wrong side of the flower and weave them in.

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Step-by-Step Frost Flower

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

The Frost Flower on pages 112-113 of Crochet Garden doubles as a snowflake if you crochet it all in white. The pattern is pretty straightforward, but a few pictures will help you visualize it. Look for a Frost Flower table mat project here.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

Round 1 of the Frost Flower sets up the six petals. The large loop will be completely covered by the stitches of the next round.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

Round 2 includes clusters of hdc, dc, and tr. Note that the instructions for the clusters (“Special Abbreviations” on page 113) include a ch-st to close the cluster. So when the pattern says “2 dc-CL, ch 3,” you make the dc-cluster, ch 1 to close it, and ch 3.

Why did I write it that way? I don’t know. It must have seemed correct at the time.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

I crocheted Round 3 in light blue yarn, so you could see it better. The bumps are hdc-picots: ch 3, hdc in 3rd ch from hook. If you want the Basic Frost Flower, you’re done after this round!

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

Now for Round 4, which changes the Basic Frost Flower into a Fancy Flake. First, take a close look at the middle of the flower. The yellow lines in the photo show the small triangles formed by the ch-2s of Round 1 plus the ch 2 between petals of Round 2.

Each petal of Round 4 is worked around one triangle, which comprises

  • the ch 2 at the end of a Round 1 petal,
  • the ch 2 between petals of Round 2,
  • and the ch 2 at the beginning of a Round 1 petal.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

To begin Round 4, locate the ch 2 at the end of a Round 1 petal. Fold the flower at this point, so you can work around the ch-2. Begin at the centermost edge of the ch-2 and work toward the outside of the flower: with a slip knot on your hook, insert hook under the ch-2, draw up a loop, yo, complete the first sc, sc 1, hdc 1.

Now you’ve finished the first part of the first petal.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

The next part of the petal is worked around the ch-2 between petals, which in my flower is white.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

Crochet the final part of the petal around the ch-2 at the beginning of the next Round 1 petal. Then go on to the next petal of Round 4. Getting into position to crochet the next petal feels uncomfortably tight, but it will work.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

Round 4 is finished, and we have a Fancy Flake.

Crocheted Frost Flower or Snowflake Tutorial

Here’s the Fancy Flake, seen from the underside. You can see the bottoms of the stitches of Round 4 in six little triangle shapes around the center.

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