Tag Archives | heritage

Doily Posters at IOLI

Doily Posters at IOLI

Nineteen of the Doily Heritage Posters from the Celebrate Doilies exhibit are on display at the 65th Annual Convention of the International Organization of Lace (IOLI) in San Antonio, Texas, through Friday of this week.

As advertised, the posters tell about doily crocheters of the past and present, who are mostly from Texas. “Are there really that many stories to tell about doilies?” you may ask. When I first started collecting the stories, I wondered about that, too.

Doily Posters at IOLI

Soon I realized that doily stories are people stories, and there are more of those stories than we can collect in a lifetime. Doily stories are about families. Doily stories are about thrift and creativity. Doily stories are about mystery and mysterious connections.

If you can, go see these stories at the IOLI Convention display room, at the

El Tropicano Riverwalk Hotel
110 Lexington Avenue
San Antonio, Texas

Hours:
Thursday, July 26 and Friday, July 27
11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.

Many thanks to display coordinator and fiber Renaissance woman Pat Tittizer, who worked hard on several aspects of the IOLI convention, and provided these photos.

For more information about the IOLI, please visit www.internationalorganizationoflace.org.

Doily Posters at IOLI

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Only Three Days Left to See Celebrate Doilies

doily textile art by Suzann Thompson

Don’t wait too long! You have only three more days to see the Celebrate Doilies exhibit at the Dora Lee Langdon Center in Granbury, Texas. The exhibit’s last day in Granbury is Wednesday, September 27, 2017.

Art quilts, stories, and poetry fill the first floor of the historic Gordon Home, beginning with Constant Comets and Sweet Home, which greet you as you walk into the front door.

The two front rooms have fireplaces and bay windows, and I really like how gallery manager Joel Back displayed some of the posters on the mantels.

doily heritage poster by Suzann Thompson

In one bay window, we decorated the grand piano with Sandi Horton’s family heirloom crochet and poetry.
Sandi Horton's family heirloom crochet and poetry

In the other bay window, you’ll find posters about doilies of the past and modern doilies from Coats & Clark. They loaned designer doilies for us to display as well. The modern doilies are by designers Susan Lowman, Kathryn A. White, and Lisa Gentry.

Doilies Past and Present by Coats & Clark

Come ready to read Sandi Horton’s poetry and about crocheters of the past. Once you’ve been through the exhibit, it’s a short walk to Granbury’s historic town square, where you’ll find great food, coffee, and shopping.

doily textile art by Suzann Thompson

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Celebrate Doilies Opening Reception Today

Doily yarn bombs at Celebrate Doilies by Suzann Thompson

We’re celebrating Celebrate Doilies today, July 22, with an opening reception from noon to 2 p.m. at the Cross Timbers Fine Arts Council, 204 River North Boulevard, in Stephenville, Texas.

Just look for the big doilies on the front of the building. The one on the left is made from macramé cord from my mom’s stash. Thank you, Mom!

Suzann Thompson with baling twine doily

The doily on the right is from my dad’s stash of baling twine. Thank you, Dad!

A friend saw this photo of me with the baling twine doily and wrote, “You look so tiny.” That was sweet, and it gives you an idea of the relative size of this doily.

Once inside the gallery, turn to the right to find the Doily Panel, made by participants in a workshop at my studio on July 8–Anna, Ella, Janetta, Royce, and me.

Doily covered panel at Celebrate Doilies by Suzann Thompson

And there’s more—doily heritage, doily art quilts, and doily poetry. Come and see for yourself!

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A Celebrate Doilies Interview at March On! Texas

I met writer and historian Kelly McMichael at a town hall meeting of our U.S. Representative last spring. It was a nice surprise to find out that Kelly is a textile artist, too!

Kelly offers a different spin on the Celebrate Doilies exhibition in this post at the March On! Texas blog.

press for Celebrate Doilies

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Celebrate Doilies Kickstarter Campaign to Launch May 28–Please Donate!

On Sunday, May 28, at 12:30 p.m. Central Time, I will launch a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to cover the remaining expenses of the Celebrate Doilies! exhibit you’ve been reading about on this blog.

Donation levels start at just $5.00, and there are rewards for each level. The more you donate, the better the rewards.

Please visit my Kickstarter page, and donate for art, for poetry, for heritage!

Celebrate Doilies! is a three-part exhibit. First there are doily-inspired art quilts by me. Here’s one called Winter Blues.

Winter Blues, a TextileFusion snowflake wall hanging

Find in-progress photos of this wall hanging here.

Part two of Celebrate Doilies! is poetry by Sandi Horton. She was inspired by the crochet-work of her mother and grandmothers. Read her poem about this pretty green and white doily here (scroll down a bit).

green and white doily by Sandi Horton

The third section of Celebrate Doilies! includes stories and photos of doily crocheters past and present, and their work. Here’s one of the stories that will be in the show:

heritage at the Celebrate Doilies exhibit

The show will be beautiful, and your contribution will ensure that all the heritage posters and poems are printed and hung, and more.

I appreciate your support, and I look forward to sending your rewards!

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Tell Me About Your Doilies!

Black-Eyed Susan Doily

I’m collecting photos of doilies and stories about them and the people who made them for an exhibit I’m doing next year at the Cross Timbers Fine Arts Council, River North Gallery, in Stephenville, Texas–and beyond, I hope!

Please join me in celebrating doilies by sharing the stories of doilies in your collection. Maybe you make doilies, or maybe your ancestors made them. Whichever it is, other people will love to read your stories.

All you have to do is send me a photo and fill out a questionnaire about you, the doily, and the person who made the doily. I’ll write the story from the information you give me.

To learn how you can join in this project, visit www.textilefusion.com/doily-heritage-project and click here to see a sample doily story.

The doily shown here was crocheted by my grandmother, Charles Etta Dunlap Thompson. I never met her, but my dad told me he was amazed that she found time to crochet and quilt, even when she was taking care of a household of nine.

By the time she made this doily, my dad and my Aunt Sue may have been the only children left at home. The pattern was published in 1949, when they would still have been in high school.

detail of Black-Eyed Susan Doily

Finding the publication date was a job for the Doily Detective (me). First I searched “daisy doily crochet pattern.” This returned lots of beautiful doilies, but not this one.

Well…the flowers might be sunflowers, I thought. A search of “sunflower doily crochet” turned up another batch of lovely pieces and hey! There was an image similar to my grandmother’s doily!

A few more clicks took me to a site that offers free vintage crochet patterns. That’s where I found out that this doily is called the Black-Eyed Susan Doily.

I searched Ravelry, an online knitting and crochet community, for the Black-Eyed Susan Doily, and found that it was published in January 1949 in Coats & Clark O. N. T. #258 Floral Doilies leaflet (pattern #D-207). The pattern also appeared in a leaflet called Floral Doilies for Crocheting.

Like quilts, doilies are an important part of our heritage. Quilts have been studied and written about extensively, but doilies have not. Let’s do something about this!

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Knickerbocker Yarn

“What’s a knickerbocker?” asked Charles. He was reading a book, in which a woman was described as having the “best knickerbocker lineage.”

“Eye-oh-no,” I said, because I was too busy crocheting to enunciate. Then I said the words dreaded by schoolchildren everywhere: “Why don’t you look it up?”

Knickerbocker yarn handspun by my friend Joan

Thank goodness, Charles is long past his school days, so he looked it up right away. The lady in the book was descended from the Knickerbockers, a nickname for the original Dutch settlers in New Netherland, which was later split into New York and New Jersey (USA). There was actually a man surnamed Knickerbocker, who was one of those original settlers.

“Hey, here’s Knickerbocker yarn!” said Charles. He’s a good guy–always thinking of me. Knickerbocker yarn is flecked with different colors. A surprising (to me) number of web sites give information about this yarn, which is also called Knicker yarn or Nepp yarn. You card small balls of wool or silk noil into a longer fiber and then spin it all up together.

So I guess this pretty yarn, handspun by my friend Joan L., would be Knickerbocker yarn.

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