Tag Archives | rose

Crocheting Flowers for Puzzling Pinks

Suzann Thompson's Puzzling Pink quilt at the Cross Timbers Fine Arts Council

Crocheted flowers for Suzann Thompson's Puzzling Pink quilt

Pink! It’s my most favorite color. It’s a good thing too, because the Puzzling Pink wall hanging is covered with dozens of pink flowers and I crocheted them all. And appliqued them.

Crocheted flowers for Suzann Thompson's Puzzling Pink quilt

These softly variegated flowers, made with Prism’s Kid Slique, are adapted from the Russian Picot Daisy pattern in Crochet Garden. Such luscious yarn!

Also from Crochet Garden, I made Anemones in Aunt Lydia’s No. 10 crochet cotton, Begonias in a Spud & Chloe yarn, and Tabby Ovals in a long discontinued yarn.

Crocheted flowers for Suzann Thompson's Puzzling Pink quilt

Crocheted flowers for Suzann Thompson's Puzzling Pink quilt

The long-stemmed buds are from the Valentine Roses pattern in Cute Crochet World.

Crocheted flowers for Suzann Thompson's Puzzling Pink quilt

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European Rose Featured at Lion Brand

European Rose from Crochet Garden

Lion Brand Yarn Company provides the pattern for our May 2012 Crochet Along! The European Rose from Crochet Garden is featured at Lion Brand’s website, with free instructions, step-by-step photos, and some hints for easier crocheting.

The white Yorkshire Rose was my original inspiration for this flower, but by changing the petal colors, you can also make a Lancashire Rose (all red petals) or a Tudor Rose (white petals inside, red petals outside). When my mom saw this design, she said, “Oh, it’s a Martin Luther’s Rose!”

Then I saw it in a book, under the name “Alchemical Rose.”

It’s a rose by many other names.

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Valentine Project from New Book!

Van Wyk Roses from Crochet Garden

For Valentine’s Day, Lark Crafts is offering a free crocheted Van Wyk Rose pattern from Crochet Garden. They’re hoping this pattern will make you fall in love with the book and buy it when it is released in May 2012. I think the book is pretty adorable, but I’m its mother, so of course I would think that.

The rose is the namesake of artist Helen Van Wyk. She made gorgeous flower paintings and taught her technique to others through books and workshops. She encouraged artists first to sketch the basic shapes in a flower, then add the petals and other details over this foundation.

Van Wyk’s sketch of the basic rose shape looked like a set of bowls nestled together. “That reminds me of a rose, even without the petals!” I said to myself, and set out to make a similar design in crochet.

I hope you enjoy this easy-to-make design.

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Nana Sadie Rose and Her Fabulous Project Bags

pretty bags at Nana Sadie Rose’s booth

We’ve all made friends online. Every now and then, on a very happy day, we get to meet one of them in person!

Years ago, I joined a Yahoo group of knitters. Among them was Nana Sadie Rose. At the time she was knitting lace things and learning the wonders of the lace lifeline. She also designed and sewed the most lovely and useful tote bags and project bags.

Nana Sadie Rose and Suzann at the Knit & Crochet Show

Naturally, because Nana Sadie Rose herself knits, her bags are especially good for knitters and crocheters. She makes them in various sizes for different kinds of projects and she makes sure they have plenty of pockets for tools and needles and such.

I have wanted one of those bags for a long, long time. Finally, at the Knit & Crochet Show in September, my wish came true! Nana Sadie Rose was there in person selling all kinds of bags. One of them had a button custom-made by…me!

The best part of it all was that I met Nana Sadie Rose, in person, finally. She is as lovely as her name.

My pretty bag from Nana Sadie Rose

On her website, http://www.nanasadierose.com, she lists the shows where she has a booth. You can also order online from her stock OR she will make a special bag with fabrics that you choose from her online fabric partners. Oh, my gosh. You’ll be sighing over all the beautiful fabric choices for hours.

My owl bag (Posy style) was the cutest in the whole booth (except for the skeleton bag, perhaps). Currently, it has socks-in-progress inside.

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Oval Center Rose Tutorial

(This was originally published at Suzann’s Textilefusion, back when Curious and Crafty Readers was having technical difficulties. It really belongs here, so here it is!)

Oval Center Rose from Crochet Bouquet

My cousin Phyllis was paging through Crochet Bouquet, when she saw the Oval Center Rose on pages 28-29. “Is this photographed at an angle, or does it really look like that?” she asked.

Yes, it does! It is photographed straight-on, and it really is oval, like so many of the stylized roses I see on china, tin boxes, and other decorative objects.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

The Oval Center Rose is our crochet along project for May. It starts with a round of single crochet (Photo 1). The lovely pink yarn is Universal Yarns Cotton Supreme.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

The Rose starts going oval in Round 2 (Photo2), with graduated stitch heights. To give the flower a lighter appearance, this round has ch-spaces between the stitches.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

Photo 3 shows the last round of the oval center. The graduated stitch heights make the oval even longer.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

Round 4 (Photo 4) sets up the petals of Round 5. The sc-sts between the ch-loops serve as anchor sts for Round 6.

 crocheted Oval Center Rose

In Photo 5, you see Round 5 finished, except for the final joining ch-st. It is worked around the first sc of Rnd 4 (an anchor st). To do this, take the hook behind your work, insert it under the petal you just finished. Now take the hook in front of the anchor sc, and back to the back under the next petal. Yarn over and draw the loop around the stitch and through the original loop on your hook.

Round 6 is where you add the final ruffly finish, worked in the back loops only. That’s what creates the subtle outline around the stitches of Rnd 5. The first petal is different than the others, so check the instructions.

 crocheted Oval Center Rose

To keep the petals from melding together on this last round, you ch 2, sl st around the anchor stitch, ch 2, between the petals. Sometimes it’s easier to fold the flower at the anchor stitch, and sl st around it from the back, as in Photo 6. The plum circle surrounds the 2nd petal, and the hook is under the anchor stitch, to which the yellow arrow points.

 crocheted Oval Center Rose

At the end of Rnd 6, turn the flower to the back. Find the very first anchor stitch with the sl st around it. Insert your hook under the loops of this sl st, yoh, and complete another sl st. In Photo 7, you’re looking at the back of the rose, and the hook is under the loops of the sl st around the first anchor st. All that’s left to do is finish the final sl st, end off, and weave in the ends.

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A Brain Vacation

 After finishing my book back in May, my brain needed a break. Luckily, about that time, the Herrschners catalog arrived. It’s one of my favorite things to find in the mailbox. Even more luckily, an embroidery kit I had admired was on sale!

The kit was the Garden Beauty Table Runner by Village Linens. It has shaded lavender roses and other flowers and leaves. All the correct colors of embroidery floss and even a needle were included in the kit. Ahhh. So easy on the brain.

I embroider while my girls are in their piano lessons. Some evenings I do a few lengths of floss for relaxation.

Eight-year-old Ella noticed how the same color floss looks like it has different shades when you see the work in a certain light. It’s the satin stitch that does that. I spend a lot of time admiring the effect. 

The table runner may be done by the end of the year, but there’s no real deadline. Yay!

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Oval Center Rose for May

Oval Center Rose from Crochet Bouquet

My cousin Phyllis was paging through Crochet Bouquet, when she saw the Oval Center Rose on pages 28-29. “Is this photographed at an angle, or does it really look like that?” she asked.

Yes, it does! It is photographed straight-on, and it really is oval, like so many of the stylized roses I see on china, tin boxes, and other decorative objects.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

The Oval Center Rose is our crochet along project for May. It starts with a round of single crochet (Photo 1). The lovely pink yarn is Universal Yarns Cotton Supreme.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

The Rose starts going oval in Round 2 (Photo2), with graduated stitch heights. To give the flower a lighter appearance, this round has ch-spaces between the stitches.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

Photo 3 shows the last round of the oval center. The graduated stitch heights make the oval even longer.

crocheted Oval Center Rose

Round 4 (Photo 4) sets up the petals of Round 5. The sc-sts between the ch-loops serve as anchor sts for Round 6.

 crocheted Oval Center Rose

In Photo 5, you see Round 5 finished, except for the final joining ch-st. It is worked around the first sc of Rnd 4 (an anchor st). To do this, take the hook behind your work, insert it under the petal you just finished. Now take the hook in front of the anchor sc, and back to the back under the next petal. Yarn over and draw the loop around the stitch and through the original loop on your hook.

Round 6 is where you add the final ruffly finish, worked in the back loops only. That’s what creates the subtle outline around the stitches of Rnd 5. The first petal is different than the others, so check the instructions.

 crocheted Oval Center Rose

To keep the petals from melding together on this last round, you ch 2, sl st around the anchor stitch, ch 2, between the petals. Sometimes it’s easier to fold the flower at the anchor stitch, and sl st around it from the back, as in Photo 6. The plum circle surrounds the 2nd petal, and the hook is under the anchor stitch, to which the yellow arrow points.

 crocheted Oval Center Rose

At the end of Rnd 6, turn the flower to the back. Find the very first anchor stitch with the sl st around it. Insert your hook under the loops of this sl st, yoh, and complete another sl st. In Photo 7, you’re looking at the back of the rose, and the hook is under the loops of the sl st around the first anchor st. All that’s left to do is finish the final sl st, end off, and weave in the ends.

Eine rosane, baumwollene, gehaekelte Rose.

Pamuk iple bunu pembe gülünü Türkiye’de yaptı. DoÄŸru yazarım?

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Roses Poncho Finished!

Hurray! It’s finally done!

Suzann's crocheted Roses Poncho is finished

close-up of Suzann's crocheted Roses Poncho

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Roses Crochet Along for February

Roses Crochet-Along

February is the month for crocheting Roses. Crochet Bouquet offers several to
choose from:

The Traditional Rose (pp. 97-99) is like the rose you might see in vintage doilies or in Irish Crochet pieces. The pattern includes 5-, 6-, 7-, and 8-petal versions.

The Rolled Rose (pp. 69-70) reminds me of a crepe paper rose. It would look great on a hat brim. Later this month, I will post step-by-step photos for assembling this rose.

The Ribbon Rose (pp. 67-68) is made with a crocheted strip. One version has a picot-like edge (except quicker than picots) and the other has a shell edging. Here are step-by-step photos for assembling the ribbon rose.

The Sweetheart Rose (pp. 93-94) is like a wild rose. Variations on the pattern include a single and double round of petals, and an optional round of picots.

The Oval Center Rose (pp. 28-29) is flat, so it would make a good Valentine’s Day card decoration. This one was inspired by the stylized roses I saw on chinaware and decorated tins. I used this rose in my Roses Poncho, which you can read about in the previous post.

So choose your favorite and crochet away! If you hurry, you can use
some for Valentine’s Day gifts.

Feel free to save the crochet-along badge to your photo host, and use it on your web site or blog. If you do, please link it back to this message, which is http://www.textilefusion.com/bookblog/?p=154

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Roses Cape Nearing Finish!

roses cape nears finish!

Cousins are a wonderful thing. My girls played with their cousin Ben non-stop on a recent visit. I got to sit uninterrupted at the kitchen table for hours, sewing flowers together on the roses cape.

I talked with my sister-in-law while I sewed. I could watch the television from afar. It was great!

The flowers toward the top of the photo are already sewn. See how nice and smooth they look? The end is finally in sight. Right now, there are about 3 square feet of flowers left to sew. Yay!

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