Tag Archives | scarf

Two Scarves in Love of Crochet

Snowflake Scarf by Suzann Thompson, Love of Crochet magazine

Publishing craft designs in magazines is all about waiting. And waiting. It seems like forever, but the waiting does pay off eventually, like it recently did for me. Yay! Finally I can talk about these two scarves!

The Sparkling Snowflake Scarf is a Crochet Charm Lace project, made of small, medium, and large snowflake motifs. The flakes work up quickly in Lion Brand Wool-Ease and Wool-Ease Chunky.

See how Crochet Charm Lace works in these posts.

Snowflake Scarf by Suzann Thompson, Love of Crochet magazine

Double Bullion & Shell Scarf by Suzann Thompson, Love of Crochet magazine

Crochet Garden readers will recognize the double bullion stitches on this silvery gray scarf, crocheted with Premier Yarns Deborah Norville Collection Alpaca Dance.

You’ll find the tall double bullion stitch in the Russian Spoke Flower on page 100 of Crochet Garden, and the shell picot in the Russian Picot Daisy on page 76. Here’s a tutorial for the Russian Spoke Stitch/Picot, which will help as you’re making the scarf.

If you can’t find the print edition of Love of Crochet in your favorite magazine-shopping spot, a digital version is available at the InterweaveStore.com.

Double Bullion & Shell Scarf by Suzann Thompson, Love of Crochet magazine

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Crochet this Luxurious Picot Fringe Scarf!

Picot Fringe Scarf by Suzann Thompson

Interweave Crochet Accessories 2016 brings us another project-packed issue, with a convenient pattern index that shows approximately how much time each project takes to crochet.

Among the more time-consuming—but totally worth it—projects is the Picot Fringe Scarf by me, Suzann Thompson!

Picot Fringe Scarf by Suzann Thompson

A pretty flower-lattice pattern makes the body of the scarf, while each strand of fringe includes six sets of picots. The subtly shaded yarn, Dream in Color Smooshy, adds depth to the already unusual and extravagant picot fringe.

The print magazine, Interweave Crochet Accessories 2016, is on newsstands now. Purchase print or digital versions online at http://www.interweavestore.com/crochet-accessories-2016?source=igodigital.

Photos copyright 2016 by Interweave Crochet, Donald Scott, photographer. Used with permission.

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Mark Your Calendars for Great Crochet!

We have a lot to celebrate on March 17 this year. We’ll wear green or maybe drink green beverages in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. Then we can mosey down to the nearest newsstand for a copy of the Spring 2015 issue of Interweave Crochet.

Interweave Crochet, Spring 2015

(Photo credit: Interweave Crochet/Harper Point Photography)

One of my career goals has been to publish a design in Interweave Crochet. Well, this is it! My crochet charm lace Dogwood Scarf appears in this issue. And here’s the best part: it’s on the cover.

I hope you’ll buy a copy, because it has lots more great crochet designs in it. Or better yet, subscribe. Find more information here: Interweave Crochet, Spring 2015.

Find a photo-tutorial for the Dogwood flower at http://www.textilefusion.com/bookblog/?p=892

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A Crochet Charm Lace Project in Noro Knitting Magazine!

Look for this lovely scarf pattern in the Spring/Summer 2014 issue of Noro Knitting Magazine! Crocheting flowers is even more fun as you watch the yarn changing gradually from one lovely color to the next. Whenever you get to a green section, crochet leaves!


Credit: Noro Knitting Magazine Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Paul Amato for LVARepresents.com

Here is the scarf in progress:


Flowers and leaves drying after blocking.


Arranging flowers and leaves on the scarf template.

The flowers and leaves were adapted from patterns in Crochet Bouquet: Easy Designs for Dozens of Flowers.

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New Crochet Charm Lace Scarf, Starring Televisions

For crocheters and fans of word play, here is the TelevisionStars Scarf. The motifs are from Cute Crochet World: “Vintage Television” (with regular antenna) and the Simple and Elementary School Stars of “Starry Night.”

The TVs are made with Classic Elite Liberty Wool. My stash of golden color yarns came in handy for the stars. You can use a wide range of weights and fibers of yarn in a Crochet Charm Lace scarf.

After finishing and blocking all the TVs and stars, I arranged them right-side-down on my scarf template (mine is a strip of burlap, but any sturdy fabric will do). Think of trying to fit a lot of oddly shaped pieces into as small an area as possible, and you’ll understand what arranging motifs for Crochet Charm Lace is like. The arrangement was fairly good, but a lot of spaces were too small to fit another star into, but too large to leave open.

I chose Lion Brand Cotton Bamboo “Cherry Blossom” for the filler motifs, because its pretty vintage color looked great with the old-fashioned televisions. Some filler motifs are single crochet sts worked into a ring; the others are half double crochet sts worked into a ring.

Once all the motifs were in place, I safety-pinned each motif onto the fabric template. It was time to sew. Through trial and error, I have learned that yarn makes sturdier seams than sewing thread. I split sewing lengths of one of the gold 4-ply yarns into two 2-ply strands and used the for sewing.

After sewing about six inches of motifs together, I couldn’t wait to look at the finished product. Wow! I loved it!

On my way home from New York, one of my flights was cancelled because of storms in the Dallas area. While waiting for the next flight, I sewed stars and TVs. Our altered route took us around the storms, adding 45 minutes to our travel time. I sewed TVs and stars.

Back at home, I took out all the safety pins. The next step is my favorite part of Crochet Charm Lace: turn the finished piece right-side-up.

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Free Patterns and Instructions

Crocheted Leaves and Berry Spray by Suzann

Sometimes there just aren’t enough pages in a book! But luckily for us, the internet is the perfect place to share some of the patterns that we couldn’t squeeze into Crochet Garden: Bunches of Flowers, Leaves, and Other Delights.

Amanda and Shannon, the Needlework Team at Lark Crafts, featured free instructions for the Leaves and Berries Spray on their blog last Friday. The samples show the spray with crocheted berries, like the one above, and with button berries.

Zwiebelmuster inspires Crochet Design

I’ve always loved my mom’s blue and white Zwiebelmuster (onion pattern) china. It seemed natural to study and sketch the flowers of this popular design when researching ideas for Crochet Garden.

Zwiebelmuster inspires Crochet Design

A small border element (the pink arrow is pointing to it) on this Zwiebelmuster tray led to the Leaves and Berries Spray. You never know what small detail can inspire! Here’s a close-up so you can see it better.

The ideas for the Curlicue Sprays and Leafy Spray in Crochet Garden came from this china, too.

Crocheted Trillium and Violet Leaf Scarf

A Scarf Project

The Trillium Scarf, worked in Dale of Norway Yarns, is a colorful example of flower cloth. You’ll need Crochet Garden for the Trillium and Violet Leaf patterns. Instructions and step-by-step photos for putting together the Trillium Scarf at the Lark Crafts blog.

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See You at TNNA!

Flower Cloth Scarf with Trilliums and Violet Leaves from Crochet Garden

Yarn shop owners, yarn manufacturers, and needlework professionals are getting pretty excited about The National Needlework Association Summer Trade Show, this coming weekend in Columbus, Ohio.

Dale of Norway Yarns is hosting a book-signing for Crochet Garden, at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 23. We’ll have a limited number of books to give away. And you can see this pretty Trillium Flower Cloth Scarf up-close and personal.

If you’d like to read more about TNNA’s show and find links to the organization, please visit my other blog.

Hope to see you there!

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See You at TNNA!

Flower Cloth Scarf with Trilliums and Violet Leaves from Crochet Garden

Yarn shop owners, yarn manufacturers, and needlework professionals are getting pretty excited about The National Needlework Association Summer Trade Show, this coming weekend in Columbus, Ohio.

Dale of Norway Yarns is hosting a book-signing for Crochet Garden, at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 23. We’ll have a limited number of books to give away. And you can see this pretty Trillium Flower Cloth Scarf up close and personal.

Hope to see you there!

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The Cover of Crochet Bouquet

some of Crochet Bouquet

The bright, happy, flowery cover of Crochet Bouquet was designed by Cindy LaBreacht. People love the strands of flowers at the top and bottom. More than one reader has asked me how to crochet them, including my fellow Texan, Rene. She writes:

Your book’s cover design inspired me to make a really fun spring scarf. I was wondering if you might tell me how to make the leaf chain that’s behind the flowers?

Another reader wanted to make a swag, just like the one on the book cover, to hang above her daughter’s bedroom door.

Crochet Bouquet

I took a photo of some of the actual cover flowers (at the top of this post), so you could see how they really are. Cover designer Cindy LaBreacht probably used Photoshop or a similar program, to make all the flower images the same size, which they aren’t in real life. She cut and pasted those little leaves together, and added the resized flowers.

However, you can still make a pretty scarf or swag. To make the flowers all the same size, you’ll have to experiment with different yarn weights. Make the larger flowers in finer yarns, and the smaller flowers in heavier yarns, in order to equalize their size. This might take you a while, but it’s worth it if that’s what you want.

For Rene’s scarf, I suggested making some compound leaves and sewing them together, then sewing the flowers on top of the leaves. Or one could make a very long compound leaf (just keep repeating the instructions for the side leaves), and sew the flowers on top of it. The flowers could be different sizes–in fact, I think that would look more natural.

For a swag, how about buying a swag or garland of greenery from a craft store, and sewing or gluing crocheted flowers on top of that? It would be sturdier than a swag made completely of crochet.

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